New Delhi -°C
Today in New Delhi, India

Oct 23, 2019-Wednesday
-°C

Humidity
-

Wind
-

Select city

Metro cities - Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, Kolkata

Other cities - Noida, Gurgaon, Bengaluru, Hyderabad, Bhopal , Chandigarh , Dehradun, Indore, Jaipur, Lucknow, Patna, Ranchi

Wednesday, Oct 23, 2019

Land hurdle in way of Barapullah-3 corridor set to go

Delhi government has announced acquisition of two patches of land which were holding back work on the already delayed project.

delhi Updated: Sep 16, 2019 06:17 IST
Ashish Mishra
Ashish Mishra
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
The elevated corridor aims to provide seamless connectivity between Mayur Vihar-I and Sarai Kale Khan, where it will meet the existing Barapullah-I elevated corridor, making the nearly 9.5km journey to AIIMS signal free.
The elevated corridor aims to provide seamless connectivity between Mayur Vihar-I and Sarai Kale Khan, where it will meet the existing Barapullah-I elevated corridor, making the nearly 9.5km journey to AIIMS signal free. (Burhaan Kinu/HT PHOTO)
         

Delhi government has issued a gazette notification, announcing the acquisition of two plots of land which had been holding back the construction work on the phase three of the Barapullah elevated corridor, connecting Mayur Vihar in east Delhi with Sarai Kale Khan and INA market in the south.

The government issued the notification on September 5, declaring the acquisition of two patches of land, together measuring 750 metres. The two patches — 250m and 500m in length — had stalled the progress of the 3.5-km elevated corridor project for the last four years. The land belongs to farmers of Nagli Razapur village near Sarai Kale Khan.

However, with the government notification coming out, the Public Works Department (PWD) will be able to start work on the private plots to finish the project, which has already been delayed by two years.

The corridor is being built on the Yamuna floodplain, where a number of landless farmers live and cultivate crops.

The elevated corridor aims to provide seamless connectivity between Mayur Vihar-I and Sarai Kale Khan, where it will meet the existing Barapullah-I elevated corridor, making the nearly 9.5km journey to AIIMS signal free.

“… In total, 34,526 Sq. Mtr (3.4526 hectares) land is required in the Nagli Rajapur village of sub-division Defence Colony in district southeast for public purpose for the 3rd phase of the project, for construction of elevated road starting from Sarai Kale Khan to Mayur Vihar… Preliminary investigation was conducted by a team constituted by collector under the Right to Fair Compensation and Transparency in Land Acquisition, Rehabilitation and Resettlement (Social Impact Assessment and Consent) Rules, 2014,” the government notification read.

It added that eight families are likely to be displaced due to the proposed acquisition, and the additional district magistrate (south east) has been appointed as administrator for the rehabilitation and resettlement of the affected families.

Construction of the corridor started in 2015, and was scheduled to be completed in October 2017, but the project progressed tardily because of the 8.5 acre (750 m) tract serving as a stumbling block.

To acquire the land, a Social Impact Assessment (SIA) study was carried out by
Ambedkar University’s School of Human Ecology. The report for the same was submitted on March 14, 2018.

“With the land acquisition notification being published, the major hurdle of the project seems to be addressed. We are hopeful of erecting columns and launching girders on the (private) land by March 2020. Over 70% construction work of the project has been completed,” a senior PWD official said on the condition of anonymity.

PWD officials said it would take at least a year-and-a-half to finish work after the land is acquired and handed over to them for construction. “We need to dig eight wells to support the bridge over the Yamuna. Two of these will have to be on the yet-to-be acquired land. Erecting columns there is tougher because of the swampy soil, and it will take around eight months to build the two wells,” he said.

S Velmurugan, senior principal scientist, traffic engineering and safety division, Central Road Research Institute (CRRI), said the chances of a court staying the project, if farmers approach them over issues of compensation, are “bleak” due its importance and the “larger public interest” involved in the project.

He added that the corridor will not only improve connectivity between east and south Delhi but decongest key stretches of nearby areas such as Ring Road, Delhi-Noida-Direct flyway, NH-24, Noida Link Road among others.

“Once the corridor is opened, airport bound commuters
from east Delhi, Noida and Ghaziabad will be the main beneficiaries of the project. It will serve as an arterial road that will decongest major choke points on other arterial and tributary roads,” he said.

First Published: Sep 16, 2019 00:40 IST

top news