Sex ratio improves in Delhi, infant mortality rate down: Govt data | delhi news | Hindustan Times
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Sex ratio improves in Delhi, infant mortality rate down: Govt data

Sex ratio at birth has gone up in Delhi to 902 females per 1,000 males in 2016. Infant mortality rate — the number of deaths of infants under one-year old per 1,000 live births — has also gone down from 23.25 in 2015 to 21.35 in 2016.

delhi Updated: Aug 03, 2017 11:54 IST
Anonna Dutt
The infant mortality rate -- the number of deaths of infants under one-year old per 1,000 live births – has also gone down in Delhi.
The infant mortality rate -- the number of deaths of infants under one-year old per 1,000 live births – has also gone down in Delhi. (Hindustan Times)

The sex ratio at birth in the capital has increased by four points, according to the annual report on registration of births and deaths 2016. The sex ratio has gone up to 902 females per 1,000 males in 2016, up from 898 in 2015.

“When it comes to checking sex-selective abortion, the situation is improving in Delhi. The health department is taking several measures such as registering ultrasound machine manufacturers as well as the clinics to curb sex selection. An informer reward scheme will also be introduced,” said a Delhi government official.

The infant mortality rate — the number of deaths of infants under one-year old per 1,000 live births — has also gone down in Delhi.

“The infant mortality has decreased from 23.25 deaths per thousand live births in 2015 to 21.35 in 2016,” said Deputy Chief Minister Manish Sisodia while unveiling the report on Wednesday. India’s infant mortality is 37 per 1,000 live births.

There has also been an increase in institutional births — meaning deliveries at a hospital or health centre. 86.74 per cent of all births happened at a health centre in 2016, as compared to 84.41 per cent in 2015.

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When it comes to the causes of death, according to the report, septicaemia was the major killer during 2016, accounting for 8.48 per cent of all deaths that happened in hospitals or other health units. This was followed by hypertensive diseases (7.55%), shock (4.79%), tuberculosis (4.12%) and diseases of pulmonary circulation (4.05%).

As for the vector-borne diseases, the report shows that 206 people died of dengue last year, whereas only 10 dengue deaths were recorded by the South Delhi Municipal Corporation, the nodal agency for collection and compilation of dengue, chikungunya and malaria in Delhi.

There was underreporting even in 2015, when Delhi had its worst dengue outbreak. The annual birth and death report showed that 486 people had died of dengue fever, whereas the corporation had declared only 60 deaths. The Comptroller and Auditor General of India had also slammed the corporation for underreporting.

This year’s report also shows that 122 people died of malaria in 2016, whereas only 17 “suspected” deaths had been registered.

Last year, another 248 people died of seasonal influenza, according to the report.