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Home / India News / Extreme rainfall from July 19 may trigger more floods in NE : IMD

Extreme rainfall from July 19 may trigger more floods in NE : IMD

The Central Water Commission on Wednesday said 52 stations in Bihar, Assam, Uttar Pradesh, West Bengal, Jharkhand, and Arunachal Pradesh have reported severe flood and above normal flood situation.

india Updated: Jul 17, 2020 03:53 IST
Jayashree Nandi
Jayashree Nandi
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
A flood affected family takes shelter on the roof of their partially submerged house along river Brahmaputra in Morigaon district, Assam on Thursday.
A flood affected family takes shelter on the roof of their partially submerged house along river Brahmaputra in Morigaon district, Assam on Thursday.(AP File Photo )

Northeastern states, including flood-hit areas like Assam, are likely to receive extremely heavy rains from Sunday that will trigger further flooding in the region, India Meteorological Department (IMD) said on Thursday. Widespread and heavy rain is also expected in the northwestern plains, including Delhi, from Friday to Monday, it added. Delhi has received 52% less rainfall this season while northwestern India has a 16% rain deficiency.

National Weather Forecasting Centre senior scientist R K Jenamani said the monsoon trough, which had moved to the foothills around July 8, moved back to its normal position around July 14. Jenamani added it is likely to move northwards again. “The western end of the monsoon trough will move to northwest India, where it will bring heavy and widespread rains while the eastern end will move to the Himalayan foothills bringing extremely heavy rainfall to the eastern and northeastern states. These states should be prepared.”

IMD director general M Mohapatra said extremely heavy rains can trigger flooding once again in these regions.

The death toll from floods in Assam rose to 66 on Wednesday as six more people drowned. The deluge has affected over 3.5 million people and submerged around 90% of the Kaziranga National Park and Tiger Reserve.

The Central Water Commission on Wednesday said 52 stations in Bihar, Assam, Uttar Pradesh, West Bengal, Jharkhand, and Arunachal Pradesh have reported severe flood and above normal flood situation. Severe flood is declared when water levels touch or exceed the danger level but are below the highest level.

Parts of Maharashtra and Konkan have been receiving very heavy rain since Tuesday with some places recording over 20 cm rain over two days.

Tillari Dam in Maharashtra’s Kolhapur district has filled up to 80% of its full capacity. Since heavy rain has been predicted in its catchment, water releases from the dam as per standard operating procedure should be made, the commission said.

There is also a possibility of urban flooding in Mumbai, according to Central Water Commission CWC) . Sudden rise in water levels was expected amid very heavy rains and high waves in the range of 3.5-3.7 metres until Friday along the Maharashtra coast from Malvan to Vasai and cause flooding, according to CWC.

Nine states have recorded excess rains—20 to 59% above normal--until Thursday. As many as two have received large excess—over 60% above normal. Eighteen states are in the normal category— (-19% to 19%) and seven in deficient (-59% to -20%). One state is in the large deficient category (-99% to -60%).

The country has overall received 10% excess rains during the ongoing monsoon season till Thursday. The monsoon is key to India’s farm output as around 55% of the country’s arable land is rain-fed.

Moderate to severe thunderstorms and lightning were also very likely over places like Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh on Friday. HT on July 5 reported that at least 315 people have been killed due to lightning strikes this year since May 15 mainly in Bihar and Uttar Pradesh. Lightning incidence has increased by 20% over the last 20 years, according to an analysis of the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM) based on satellite data from 1995 to 2015. “It is in part due to climate change, which has led to high moisture availability because of the higher ocean surface temperatures,” said S D Pawar, an IITM scientist, who specialises in atmospheric electricity..

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