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Home / India News / No unilateral change to status quo, agree India-China: 10 points

No unilateral change to status quo, agree India-China: 10 points

There have been several rounds of talks between top Chinese and Indian army commanders in the Ladakh region since 20 Indian soldiers and an unknown number of Chinese troops were killed on June 15 in their worst clash in 45 years.

india Updated: Jul 06, 2020 15:59 IST
hindustantimes.com | Edited by: Amit Chaturvedi
hindustantimes.com | Edited by: Amit Chaturvedi
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
An Indian Army convoy moves along a highway leading to Ladakh, at Gagangeer in Kashmir's Ganderbal district, on June 18.
An Indian Army convoy moves along a highway leading to Ladakh, at Gagangeer in Kashmir's Ganderbal district, on June 18.(Reuters File Photo)

The Chinese army on Monday begun falling back in Ladakh’s Galwan Valley, which last month saw the worst flare-up of violence in four decades.

Behind this development is a video call between National Security Advisor (NSA) Ajit Doval and Chinese Foreign Minister and State Councilor Wang Yi. During the call, they had a frank discussion on the recent developments, people familiar with the matter said.

Here are the latest developments in the India-China border face-off:

1. Both NSA Doval and minister Wang agreed that both sides should maintain peace and tranquillity in the border areas as it is essential for further development of bilateral relations between India and China, top government officials said. They also agreed that both sides should complete the ongoing disengagement process along the Line of Actual Control (LAC) expeditiously, the officials added.

2. During the discussions, both the Special Representatives on the boundary issue re-affirmed that India and China should strictly respect and observe the LAC and not take any unilateral action to alter the status quo, an external affairs ministry statement issued later said.

3. It was also agreed upon that the diplomatic and military officials of the two sides should continue their discussions, the statement said.

4. The disengagement came six days after commander-level talks took place (on June 30) to cool the situation in eastern Ladakh’s Galwan Valley area.

5. China on Monday said “progress” had been made between the two militaries, and that the two sides will continue to work to implement the consensus reached at the two previous rounds of talks.

6. The Chinese troops agreed to move back in the Galwan Valley on Monday. The Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) has possibly moved back by 1 to 1.5 km from the friction site, people familiar with developments said.

7. “Disengagement with the PLA has started as per agreed terms in the Corps Commander’s meeting. The PLA was seen removing tents and structures at Patrolling Point 14,” said a person aware of the developments.

8. The Chinese foreign ministry on July 1 had welcomed the June 30 military-level talks.

9. During the talks, th military commanders had agreed to work on an “expeditious, phased and step-wise de-escalation” of the ongoing border conflict “on priority”.

10. There have been several rounds of talks between top Chinese and Indian army commanders in the Ladakh region since 20 Indian soldiers and an unknown number of Chinese troops were killed on June 15 in their worst clash in 45 years.

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