Din over dinner | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Aug 21, 2018-Tuesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Din over dinner

Unless you’re paying upwards of Rs 5,000 for dinner, or visiting a restaurant thrown into oblivion by bad food and worse reviews, a quiet dinner is impossible in this city.

india Updated: May 30, 2010 00:09 IST
Damini Purkayastha
Damini Purkayastha
Hindustan Times

Unless you’re paying upwards of Rs 5,000 for dinner, or visiting a restaurant thrown into oblivion by bad food and worse reviews, a quiet dinner is impossible in this city.

Last Wednesday, I took an old college friend out for dinner to a quaint Chinese restaurant. What better than catching up over seafood, right? We were early enough to get the last empty seats, but not fortunate enough to catch a corner. So, we were seated bang in the center of yapping families, celebrating black jacket-types and a table of 19-year-olds trying Mojitos for the first time.

It was loud, stuffy and the food wasn’t distraction enough from the endless times the teenagers toasted. By the end of it, I was tempted to ask the waiters if they served Disprin on the house.

Noise pollution at restaurants is a given in Delhi, especially if you’re visiting at lunch hour (aka kitty party hour). If it’s not loud obnoxious ring tones, and endless ‘helloooos’, it’s elevator music or equally inappropriate hip-hop tracks blaring loudly. If, by some miracle, the place is silent, diners take it upon themselves to eat, drink and be bloody loud.

Apparently, London faces a similar problem. Back in 2006, a slew of top restaurants across London, including that of celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay, banned the use of mobiles on the premises. Some even added the ‘please put your phone on silent’ and ‘step outside to take a call’ clause to their menus. (Great idea, innit?)

But, I guess even that didn’t work. Earlier this month, Elaine McLuskey, a product design student from Edinburgh, showcased her innovative solution to the problem. ‘Social Spheres’, as she calls them are glass bubbles worn as party headgear that allow people to have conversations even at noisy pubs. Now there’s a bubble most likey to burst!

First Published: May 29, 2010 16:06 IST