Iran to build nuke power plant within six months | india | Hindustan Times
  • Thursday, Jun 21, 2018
  •   °C  
Today in New Delhi, India
Jun 21, 2018-Thursday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Iran to build nuke power plant within six months

Iran has said that it would begin the construction its first indigenous nuclear power plant within six months in order to meet energy demands.

india Updated: Mar 14, 2006 04:49 IST
None

Iran has said that it would begin the construction its first indigenous nuclear power plant within six months in order to meet rising energy demands.

Energy Minister Parviz Fattah said that Iran's fuel resources would not be able to meet an expected doubling of electricity consumption in the next 10 years and nuclear power was therefore a necessity.

"We are not talking about a political issue but a technical one. That is why we declared that the ministry is ready to build indigenous power plants on the basis of domestic capacities," Fattah was quoted as saying.

He said a feasibility study had been done and that operations would begin in three to six months. The Atomic Energy Organization of Iran had signed a contract to provide fuel for the plant. The announcement comes as Iran defies calls to suspend its uranium enrichment activities and provide answers on its nuclear program. The UN Security Council was to discuss Iran's program this week.

Fattah did not specify where the plant would be built. Iran's first nuclear reactor has been built at Bushehr with Russian assistance and is due to come on stream this year.

In January, Iran announced plans for its second and third nuclear power plants and said that the projects would be open to international bidding. It was not clear if Fattah was referring to one of these plants or to another one.

Iran plans to build 20 more nuclear plants, and Russia has offered to build some of them.

Iran insists its program is designed only to generate electricity, but the United States claims Tehran has been working to build a bomb for more than a decade. Britain and France are also skeptical of the Iranians, and the IAEA, the UN nuclear watchdog, says it has serious questions about Iran's program.