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Johnny on the road to success

"Nana told me he sells because of his frown and I sell because of my smile," says John.

india Updated: Feb 27, 2006 11:30 IST

John Abraham’s association with Mumbai cabs doesn’t begin with Taxi No. 9 2 11. The story begins from his school and college days, followed by his early years in the industry.

John Abraham tells all about it to HT City, and much more…

On his association with cabs in real life:
“Cabs are indeed the lifeline of Mumbai. It’s part and parcel of the life of an average Mumbaikar. Since I was brought up in Mumbai, it was quite the case for for me,” recalls John.
“I used to know at least five different taxi drivers who’d race their cabs at speeds ranging from 20 kmph to 80 kmph and above. Depending on how much time I had on hand, I would sit in the cab of a particular cabbie. I remember Ranjit Singh used to be my favourite to reach school whenever I would get late,” he says.

"Nana told me he sells because of his frown and I sell because of my smile," says John.

On

Taxi No. 9 2 11


John plays Jai Mittal, a rich spoiled brat. “He is not a bad guy. It’s just that life’s one happening party for him. It’s a story about how his life changes in the span of 24 hours after he meets this taxi driver, Raghav Shastri, played by Nana Patekar.”



On doing a rap song with Nana

“It was fun,” says John. “In the beginning of the schedule Nana sir told me that he sells because of his frown and I sell because of my smile. So all we did was — smile and frown all the way.”



On his forthcoming films

After

Zinda

and

Taxi

, John will be seen in

Kaabul Express, Babul, Salaame-Ishq

and

Happy Birthday

. Talking about his range of films John says: “In my forthcoming films I portray almost all human shades.”



On his favourite genre – action

“I promise to give fans at least one Dhoom every two years.” On Deepa Mehta’s

Water

not being allowed to release in India: “Water is great cinema and I feel sad that Indian audiences won’t get to see the film,” he says. “Considering the sensitive audience we have in India, Water should be allowed to release in India.”