Kites dot the sky on Makar Sankranti | india | Hindustan Times
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Kites dot the sky on Makar Sankranti

THE CLEAR blue sky seemed to beckon everyone as the people surrendered to the joy of kite flying to mark Makar Sankranti today.

india Updated: Jan 15, 2006 20:37 IST

THE CLEAR blue sky seemed to beckon everyone as the people surrendered to the joy of kite flying to mark Makar Sankranti today.

And thus, the sky-since morning to evening-remained dotted with vivid splashes of colour as kites in a variety of hues, shapes and sizes darted across the azure blue. Youngsters continue their struggle for supremacy in the sky while the elders visited temples, made offerings to Lord Sun with water and flowers and donated alms.

Although much of north India is struggling to survive a harsh cold wave this year, denizens welcomed the traditional harvest festival with gaiety that marks the solar ingress into Capricorn, the 10th zodiac sign.

The City celebrated the festival of Makar Sankranti that heralds the end of winter as sun moved into northern hemisphere today bringing ray of hope, warmth and fertility to this part of the world. Interestingly, Makar Sankranti is one of the very few Indian festivals that follow the solar calendar. It falls on January 14 every year.

Since the cosmopolitan Indore is home to families that have settled here from all parts of the country, the communities celebrated it differently. Nevertheless, kite flying, recipes prepared from sesame, rice and jaggery and seeking blessings from deities and elders was significant part of festival. Besides, a large number of families headed for Ujjain, Omkareshwar for the holy dip and perform puja at the two Jyotirlings.

In Maharashtrian homes, people exchanged multi-coloured tilguds made from sesame seeds and sugar and til-laddus made from sesame and jaggery. Til-polis were offered for lunch. While exchanging tilguds as tokens of goodwill they greeted each other saying – ‘til-gud ghya, god god bola’ meaning ‘accept these tilguds and speak sweet words’.