Plan to create pool of engineering teachers | india | Hindustan Times
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Plan to create pool of engineering teachers

DIRECTORS OF five government engineering colleges of the state, namely Gorakhpur, Kanpur, Lucknow, Jhansi and Sultanpur, will meet at the UP Technical University (UPTU) on February 21 to discuss lack of enough quality faculty members.

india Updated: Feb 08, 2006 01:12 IST

DIRECTORS OF five government engineering colleges of the state, namely Gorakhpur, Kanpur, Lucknow, Jhansi and Sultanpur, will meet at the UP Technical University (UPTU) on February 21 to discuss lack of enough quality faculty members.

There are 211 private and government engineering colleges under the UPTU and, in most of them, there are just not enough PhD scholars teaching. This, according to UPTU vice-chancellor Professor DS Chauhan, is an area of “extreme concern”.

To meet the shortfall, the UPTU has introduced a scheme of ‘teacher fellowship’ under which 100 teachers annually will be selected. “We plan to create a pool of PhD scholars in about five years’ time. The scheme will cost the UPTU Rs 2 crore per year. But we have decided to go ahead with it as the issue of quality teaching is very important,” Prof Chauhan said.

The scheme, initially meant for meeting the shortfall in government colleges, will gradually be extended to private engineering colleges.

To begin with, the UPTU top brass is not expecting hundred per cent result.

“There should ideally be 500 PhD scholars after five years. But we are not getting too optimistic. Even if 60 per cent people complete their PhDs
there will be a substantial number of qualified faculty available,” Prof Chauhan added.

Prof Chauhan’s move to go in for ‘teacher fellowships’ is being considered significant simply because of the 211 private engineering colleges under the UPTU’s control, there are several colleges where quality of teaching has detriorated alarmingly.

“Even in some government colleges the teaching and the teachers are not up to the mark. So I guess this move is brilliant. If successful it may address the issue of poor faculty to some extent,” says a senior faculty member of a private engineering college.