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Monday, Nov 18, 2019

Poor, poor Salman

I do not see why Bollywood in the form of Dia Mirza is rushing to praise him -- and, therefore, defend him. But maybe I?m missing the wood for the deer behind the trees.

india Updated: Apr 27, 2006 01:47 IST
rejoinder | Anubha Yadav
rejoinder | Anubha Yadav
None
Hindustantimes
         

I don’t care much for Salman Khan as a star. I also don’t know him personally. So, I knew very little about the man -- until, that is, I read Dia Mirza’s article, Punish a celeb for being a celeb (April 20).

Mirza informs us -- rather forcefully -- that Salman is a ‘good man’ and we shouldn’t ever forget that. Starry-eyed me can see Mirza initiating a ‘fight club’ where she canvasses support for ‘underdog’ (read: celebrity) undertrials.

My question is: What are Salman Khan’s image-makers doing? After his arrest and short stint in jail, they should seriously consider launching a humane Salman Khan campaign roping in a few chinkara. Surely, the endangered species can do its bit for the beleaguered and repentant star. I can see  Salman of the smouldering looks -- leather jacket over the shiny chest and cowboy shoes et al chasing the creature, declaring his love for the animal, and right at the end stating in soft focus, “The real man is a chinkara man”. I can already see millions of Indians -- Salman Khan as well as chinkara fans -- thinking, ‘At last, our wildlife is safe!’

Coming back to Dia-ji’s absolute defence of Salman, a degree of judicial subjectivity does exist between one criminal act and another -- as it does, whether one likes it or not, between the identity of the perpetrator.

We all know that a few other celebrities also have a knack of hunting and shooting -- or whatever illegalities that are conducted under the cover of a forest. So, isn’t the Salman Khan episode also a case of sending out a message to these larger-than-life law-breakers that they are, when it comes to justice, also under the purview of the law of the land?

Protesting against the sentence meted out to Salman Khan is understandable. But before you protest, do remember that this is a man who is allegedly involved in multiple poaching cases and had allegedly run over pavement dwellers.

I do not see why Bollywood in the form of Dia Mirza is rushing to praise him — and, therefore, defend him. But maybe I’m missing the wood for the deer behind the trees.