Robbery, cheating not enough to register case | india | Hindustan Times
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Robbery, cheating not enough to register case

A taxi driver was thrown out of his vehicle on his way to Indore by youths who hired it from a travel agency on Hamidia Road and escaped with the vehicle. The victim somehow reached Bhopal and shuttled from Mangalwara to Parvalia to Koh-e-Fiza police stations but nobody registered the case. Reason; the scene of crime did not fall in their jurisdiction.

india Updated: Mar 08, 2006 01:17 IST

1A taxi driver was thrown out of his vehicle on his way to Indore by youths who hired it from a travel agency on Hamidia Road and escaped with the vehicle.

The victim somehow reached Bhopal and shuttled from Mangalwara to Parvalia to Koh-e-Fiza police stations but nobody registered the case. Reason; the scene of crime did not fall in their jurisdiction.

2KR Wadhwani sold his property but the banker’s cheque of Rs 5 lakh he had received from the ‘buyer’ bounced. Much to his surprise, officials at the bank asked him to surrender the cheque and even ‘negotiate’ with the other party. Wadhwani made several rounds to the Shahjehanabad police station but SHO DS Baghel flatly refused to register the case. It happened 21 days ago. The victim is still making rounds of police officers.

These are just two examples of how the police turn away complainants. In most cases the Station Officer (SO) flatly refuses to register a case, leaving the complainant with practically no option.

If such is the situation in the State capital one can imagine the fate of complaints in far-flung rural areas. In the first incident, the case could have been registered at any of the three police stations but the complaint was asked to go Ashta for registration of case.

When contacted about the reason for not registering the case in the second incident, Shahjehanabad police Station in-charge DS Baghel said he did not find it fit a case to register though he is looking into it.

He tried to avoid the subject when asked how long would it take him to judge whether the case is fit enough for registering.

This is in sharp contrast to what senior officials repeatedly claim and what the law expects from a police officer. “Some SHOs judge both the parties and the depth of their pockets and delay in registration of case leads to a person getting desperate and succumb to monitory demands,” says a policeman on conditions of anonymity.

“When it comes to educated people who are aware of their rights and will not pay off, some officers are just not interested and take complaints as headaches,” he adds.

Except cases like rape, robbery and murder, which the police have to anyhow register even though they tinker with the sections of the IPC, a majority of complaints go unregistered.

‘Complaint should be registered’
Anant Kumar Singh, Bhopal SP: When a complainant reaches the police station, his complaint should definitely be registered. Refusal to do so is wrong and absolutely unacceptable. If the SO refuses to register case, the person could complain to the SP through registered post.

Sajid Ali, Senior lawyer: There are no grounds on which a police officer can refuse registration of case except in certain non-cognisable offences. But if a police officer refuses to do so, the complainant can either go to SP or approach the court and file a private complaint.