Today in New Delhi, India
Oct 16, 2018-Tuesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

She has lost count of her dead children

TULSABAI JATAV of Nimkheda village was married at 14, bore perhaps a dozen children (can?t remember!), four survived, rest died; and she is now just 38. What?s more pathetic is she is too anemic for tubectomy. Obviously she needed health care all along which she never got.

india Updated: Feb 14, 2006 01:39 IST

TULSABAI JATAV of Nimkheda village was married at 14, bore perhaps a dozen children (can’t remember!), four survived, rest died; and she is now just 38. What’s more pathetic is she is too anemic for tubectomy. Obviously she needed health care all along which she never got.

Tulsa lives barely 33 km away from the State capital and not in some godforsaken, back-of-the-beyond hamlet. Hers is a representative, not typical case of appalling health services in rural MP.

For residents of Nimkheda village, off the busy Raisen Road, death of children right after birth and poor maternal health are mundane facts of life. Lack of reach of health care coupled with lack of awareness regarding health schemes keep the Nimkheda residents – particularly, women and children — permanently vulnerable to diseases.

The nearest health facility for the villagers is health sub-centre at Kusiyari about seven km away where one regular auxiliary nursemaid (ANM) is posted. But she is seldom, if ever, is available at the centre because she is supposed to make
round of 13 villages covered under the centre.

“We have been undertaking an informal kind of survey in some of the villages around the State capital and

things are really shocking,” Rajkumar Sharma of NGO Centre for Advocacy says. Few villagers of Nimkheda or other villages around know about maternal and infant care schemes like transportation facility for institutional delivery or the Deendayal Antyodaya Upachar Scheme under which the backward class pregnant woman (the category in which Tulsabai falls) are given financial assistance worth Rs 20,000.

Kusum Bai of the same village developed complications during the seventh month of pregnancy last July and was rushed successively from Raisen District Hospital to Sultania Lady Hospital to the Hamidia Hospital. She was saved but she lost the child. Let alone getting the financial assistance, although her family is yellow cardholder and belong to backward community, they had to shell out about Rs 7000 for the treatment.

Parvat Singh, a youth of the village mentions every family in the village has a history of children dying soon after birth. Things hardly change here.

Sharma laments that though the situation is so pathetic, the policy makers or implementers hardly take any extra efforts to amend things. “Maternal and infant health issues hardly ever come up in the State Assembly for discussion. If there is such apathy at highest level, what could be expected?” he poses.

First Published: Feb 14, 2006 01:39 IST