TB patient dies as he waits for doc | india | Hindustan Times
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TB patient dies as he waits for doc

THE IRONY couldn?t have been greater. While several seminars and workshops were being held across the city to observe World Tuberculosis Day today, a 20-year-old TB patient died at a doctor?s clinic. Reason: The doctor was not present in the clinic when the old man brought his son for treatment.

india Updated: Mar 26, 2006 00:43 IST

THE IRONY couldn’t have been greater. While several seminars and workshops were being held across the city to observe World Tuberculosis Day today, a 20-year-old TB patient died at a doctor’s clinic. Reason: The doctor was not present in the clinic when the old man brought his son for treatment.

The death of Suresh (20), a resident of Hamirpur district, exposed the lofty claims made by the Health Department that under the revised National Tuberculosis Programme, the Direct Observation Treatment (DOT) had been made available at the patients’ doorsteps in the city.

On Saturday afternoon, Rajendra Singh Gautam had brought his son from Hamirpur for treatment at the clinic of a renowned chest physician in Arya Nagar. As Rajendra waited for the doctor to turn up, he saw his son suffer and finally die at the doorstep of the renowned physician.

After the death of his son, an inconsolable Rajendra said, “Suresh was undergoing treatment at the clinic of the doctor as he had refused to treat him at the hospital. Had the doctor admitted my son to the chest hospital then my son could have been saved.”

Rajendra also said his son was not being treated as per the DOT programme. That the doctor was following the old mode of treatment was evident from the prescription Rajendra had with him.

The insensitivity of the staff at the clinic, which is a stone throw from the Murari Lal Chest Hospital or the LLR Hospital, was also evident. Had the staff advised Rajendra to take his son to one of the hospitals, Suresh’s life may have been saved.

Ironically, only yesterday the chief medical officer told mediapersons that no TB patient would die for want of medicines. But Suresh’s death proved the hollowness of such claims.

Moreover, senior doctors’ claims that state-of-the art machines have been installed at the Murari Lal Chest Hospital to provide quality treatment of TB patients also proved to doubtful.