The modern-day Shravan Kumar | india | Hindustan Times
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The modern-day Shravan Kumar

A young man from Madhya Pradesh is re-enacting the role of Shravan Kumar, the much-admired mythical character who carried his old parents on a kavad.

india Updated: Jan 29, 2006 02:39 IST
Ashok Das
Ashok Das
None

A young man from Madhya Pradesh is re-enacting the role of Shravan Kumar, the much-admired mythical character who carried his old parents on a kavad. And like the mythical Shravan, Brahmachari has decided to go that extra mile and walk it.

Kailashgiri Brahmachari, who hails from Jabalpur in Madhya Pradesh, has been on the road for the last nine years with his mother to fulfil her vow to visit the char dhams or four pilgrim centres sacred to Hindus. He carries his mother in one of the baskets hanging from the kavad while the other basket has some clothes, cooking utensils and a few other essentials. His father is no more.

Bramhachari recently visited the holy shrine of Lord Venkateshwara in the Tirumala hills, on his way from Sringeri in Karnataka to Puri in Orissa. He climbed seven hills to reach Tirumala.

“We were told that the easiest way to please the Gods is to fulfil the wishes of parents, who bring us into the world and sacrifice their own happiness and comfort to bring us up. I have decided to fulfil my mother’s wish,” he told media persons.

The journey began way back when Brahmachari was a child and he fell from a tree and broke his hand. His mother had then vowed that she would visit the char dhams in thanksgiving if her son was cured. He is just fulfilling that promise now.

A regular day on the road for him — with nightfall, he breaks his journey, cooks food and takes care of his mother. In the morning, he takes a bath, gives his mother a bath and after a frugal meal, embarks on his journey. He says the people on the route have been nice to him.

At Tirumala, pilgrims were overwhelmed by Brahmachari’s devotion and a few even touched his feet. Some volunteered to help him in whatever possible way.

“Our children ill-treat us. They are after our property. His mother must have done some real good work to get a son like him,” says Pushpalata, an elderly devotee.

Brahmachari says he just wants to make his mother happy. “If she wants to continue her pilgrimage after the completion of the char dham yatra, I am ready to take her,” he says.