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The Norwegian intervention

It was chosen to act as a mediator as it has no political or economic in the region and is considered neutral.

india Updated: Apr 26, 2006 20:08 IST

Norway's present involvement with the Lankan peace process began in 1997. It was chosen to act as a mediator as it has no political or economic in the region and is considered neutral.

Also, Norway and Sri Lanka have a long-standing development cooperation, which has focused in recent years on efforts to promote reconciliation and peace.

In 2000, Norway agreed to a request from the then President Chandrika Kumaratunga and LTTE leader Velupillai Prabhakaran to assist the process as a third party.

After the parliamentary elections in 2001, both the Wickremesinghe-led Govt and the LTTE officially requested that Norway continue to assist the parties in the peace process.

The role of Norway has been to assist the parties in their efforts to reach a political solution.

Norway's activities have focused in large part on help to facilitate communication between the parties, minimise misunderstandings, and seek common ground between their positions as the foundation for a peace process.

Norway also has supplemented the regular communication activities of the parties, upon their request, by briefing various actors in Sri Lanka and internationally.

The major players from the Norwegian side are:

Eric Solheim, Ex-Special peace envoy

Jon Hanssen-Bauer, Special peace envoy, Solheim's successor

Vidar Helgesen, Advisor to the Royal Norwegian Government

Hans Brattskar, Norwegian Ambassador to Sri Lanka.

First Published: Apr 26, 2006 20:08 IST