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Friday, Dec 13, 2019

Prince Harry takes over National Geographic’s Instagram, posts these pics

Prince Harry guest-edited the account as part of a new social media campaign ‘Looking Up’, which he hopes will raise “awareness of the vital role trees play in the earth’s eco-system.”

it-s-viral Updated: Oct 01, 2019 18:12 IST
Asian News International
Asian News International
Washington D.C.
Prince Harry lying on the ground as he points his camera up towards the sky to capture a stunning still.
Prince Harry lying on the ground as he points his camera up towards the sky to capture a stunning still. (Instagram/natgeo)
         

Royal takeover! Prince Harry took his social media skills to a new level by guest editing National Geographic’s Instagram account.

The 35-year-old royal, who is in Malawi as a part of his 10-day tour of Africa, took over National Geographic’s Instagram on Monday.

Harry guest-edited the account as part of the new social media campaign ‘Looking Up’, which he hopes will raise “awareness of the vital role trees play in the earth’s eco-system.”

For the first photo, the Duke of Sussex shared one of his own images of Baobab trees in Liwonde National Park, Malawi. The royal can be seen lying on the ground as he points his camera up towards the sky to capture the stunning still.

View this post on Instagram

Photo by @sussexroyal | We are pleased to announce that Prince Harry, The Duke of Sussex @sussexroyal is guest-curating our Instagram feed today! "Hi everyone! I’m so happy to have the opportunity to continue working with @NatGeo and to guest-curate this Instagram account; it’s one of my personal favourites. Today I’m in Liwonde National Park, Malawi an important stop on our official tour of southern Africa, planting trees for the Queens Commonwealth Canopy. As part of this takeover, I am inviting you to be a part of our ‘Looking Up’ social campaign. To help launch the campaign, here is a photograph I took today here in Liwonde of Baobab trees. "#LookingUp seeks to raise awareness of the vital role trees play in the Earth’s ecosystem, and is an opportunity for all of us to take a moment, to appreciate the beauty of our surroundings. So, join us today and share your own view, by looking up! Post images of the trees in your local community using the hashtag #LookingUp. I will be posting my favourite images from @NatGeo photographers here throughout the day, and over on @sussexroyal I will be sharing some of my favourite images from everything you post. I can’t wait to see what you see when you’re #LookingUp 🌲 🌳" ••• His Royal Highness is currently on an official tour to further the Queens Commonwealth Canopy, which was launched in 2015. Commonwealth countries have been invited to submit forests and national parks to be protected and preserved as well as to plant trees. The Duke has helped QCC projects in the Caribbean, U.K., New Zealand, Australia, Botswana, Malawi, and Tonga. Now, almost 50 countries are taking part and have dedicated indigenous forests for conservation and committed to planting millions of new trees to help combat climate change. The Duke’s longtime passion for trees and forests as nature’s simple solution to the environmental issues we face has been inspired by the work he has been doing on behalf of his grandmother, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, for many years.

A post shared by National Geographic (@natgeo) on

Writing alongside the still, Harry explained that he wanted to encourage users to post their own pictures of trees in the local community “to raise awareness of the vital role trees play in the Earth’s ecosystem” and encourage people to “appreciate the beauty of our surroundings.”

Harry also posted a photo of a strangler fig tree.

The royal went on to share another picture which features the autumn colours in the U.K., which he finds “beautiful.”

Harry visited Liwonde National Park in Malawi as part of the ongoing campaign to secure forests under the Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy, an initiative that was launched in 2015 as a network of forest conservation programs throughout the 53 countries of the Commonwealth, reported People.

Harry and his wife Meghan Markle launched their Instagram account earlier this year. They are currently sharing behind-the-scenes pictures and videos from their Africa tour.

The 35-year-old royal will reunite with Meghan and son Archie when he returns to South Africa later this week.

The Duke is currently on a 10-day tour of southern Africa. He and his wife, Meghan, travelled together to South Africa before Harry jetted off to Angola, Malawi, and Botswana.

Harry and Meghan have been raising awareness of several issues while on the royal tour, including counter-poaching operations in Malawi, violence against women in South Africa, elephant protection in Botswana and landmines in Angola.