Beware of these common monsoon diseases; expert tips on how to prevent them

Published on Jun 11, 2022 12:55 PM IST

Eating nutritious foods to keep cold and flu at bay, drinking boiled or filtered water, maintaining good overall hygiene, using mosquito repellents are some of the measures one can take to stay healthy during the season.

 During rainy days, one's immune system also takes a hit.(Pixabay)
 During rainy days, one's immune system also takes a hit.(Pixabay)

The onset of monsoon brings a much-needed respite from the scorching heat but at the same poses a greater risk of infections through mosquitoes, water, air and even contaminated food. Every year, the cases of dengue, malaria, gastroenteritis, and other respiratory infections witness a rise during this season, adding to health expenses of people. The humid climate and heavy rains may lead to numerous infectious diseases. During rainy days, one's immune system also takes a hit and may lead to many water-borne diseases too. This means that one should not only take measures to prevent mosquito bites by wearing long-sleeved shirts and long trousers but also think twice before consuming outside food or water. (Also read: Monsoon diet: Foods to eat and avoid during rainy season)

Eating nutritious foods to keep cold and flu at bay, drinking boiled or filtered water, maintaining good overall hygiene, using mosquito repellents are some of the measures one can take to stay healthy during the season.

Dr Vikrant Shah, Consulting Physician, Intensivist and Infectious Disease Specialist, Zen Multispeciality Hospital, Chembur talks about some of the common monsoon ailments and how to safeguard yourself against them.

· Malaria: It is spread via Anopheles mosquitoes. Malaria cases spike in monsoon as there is a problem of water clogging in many areas which makes it a breeding ground for mosquitoes. The symptoms of it are fever, body pain, chills, and sweating. To keep malaria at bay, try to avoid stagnated water near the house, and use mosquito repellents.

· Cold and flu: The sudden shift in the temperature during monsoon can make one prone to bacterial and viral attacks, resulting in cold and flu. Hence, one should opt for nutritious food to boost immunity.

· Dengue: It is commonly seen during monsoon and spreads through mosquito bites of Aedes aegypti mosquito. The red flags of it are fever, rashes, headaches, and low platelet count. Try to wear full-sleeved clothes to prevent mosquito bites.

· Chikungunya: Is seen due to mosquitoes born in stagnated water. This disease is caused by tiger Aedes Albopictus, and the symptoms of it are joint pain, fatigue, chills, and fever. Try to do regular jogging in your surroundings and avoid water stagnation in pots, tyres, or tanks in the house.

· Cholera: It is waterborne infection, caused by strains of bacteria called Vibrio cholera. Cholera tends to impact the gastrointestinal tract causing severe dehydration and diarrhea. So, make sure to drink boiled, treated, or purified water to avoid falling sick.

· Typhoid fever can strike due to contaminated food and water. Hence, following proper hygiene and sanitation can help you to prevent it.

· Hepatitis A occurs owing to contaminated food and water which takes a toll on the liver. The symptoms of it are fever, vomiting, and rash. Maintaining good hygiene can reduce the chances of hepatitis A.

· Leptospirosis: It is a bacterial infection transmitted from animals (like dogs, and rats) to humans. These animals carry the organism, which ends up in soil and water via their urine. When going through waterlogged areas, the disease is mainly spread through open wounds on the skin. One with leptospirosis will notice symptoms such as muscle discomfort, vomiting, diarrhoea, and skin rash are some of the symptoms of leptospirosis. Do not wade through waterlogged areas.

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