Civic body project to stop water wastage | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Civic body project to stop water wastage

Hoping to save 700 million litres of water lost daily due to leakages and pilferage, the civic body has decided to conduct a study of a cross-section of Mumbai to identify how water is wasted in leakages, the percentage of leakage and measures to prevent it.

mumbai Updated: Apr 05, 2011 01:26 IST
Sujit Mahamulkar

Hoping to save 700 million litres of water lost daily due to leakages and pilferage, the civic body has decided to conduct a study of a cross-section of Mumbai to identify how water is wasted in leakages, the percentage of leakage and measures to prevent it.

According to the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC), of the total supply of 3,400 million litres daily (mld), Mumbai loses around 700 million litres to leakage and pilferage through old and dilapidated pipelines.

In the study, the BMC has identified seven sites in the city to calculate the exact water supply and consumption. “Until we know how much water is wasted in leakage, we cannot calculate the total percentage of unaccounted for water,” said Rajiv Jalota, additional municipal commissioner (water supply).

The BMC has spent over Rs 500 crore in the last five years, from 2007, for repair and replacement of water pipelines to minimise leakage. “A 20% leakage is just an approximate figure. We would know for sure only after completing the project. The pilot project will help us rectify the problem,” said an official on the condition of anonymity, because he is not authorised to speak to the media.

The civic water department has identified seven areas in the city – five in the western suburbs and two in the island city – each with 1,100-1,400 water connections. Jawahar Nagar in Goregaon, Mamlatdar Wadi in Malad, Shankar Lane on MG Road in Kandivli, Dattapada in Borivli and parts of Ketkipada and Rawalpada in Dahisar, while in the island city, part of Parel village and the areas near Banganga and Khetwadi have been identified for the study.

These areas include slums, housing societies, chawls, towers, high-rises and so on. “BMC has started fixing meters in these areas and each connection will calculate the water supply and consumption,” Jalota said.

“Through this study we will identify and analyse whether the amount of water being supplied reaches the consumer without any loss. The project will be completed by October (after the monsoon) and we will then decide on a further course of action,” an official said, on condition of anonymity because he is not authorised to speak to the media.

Currently, the BMC supplies 3,400 mld against a demand of 4,200 mld.