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Dengue danger back in Mumbai as monsoon makes its way out

Rainfall may have been scanty over the past few weeks but rain-related ailments have been resurgent, with hospitals recording a spurt in cases of fever, dengue, malaria and gastroenteritis, among others.

mumbai Updated: Sep 27, 2014 18:23 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times

Rainfall may have been scanty over the past few weeks but rain-related ailments have been resurgent, with hospitals recording a spurt in cases of fever, dengue, malaria and gastroenteritis, among others.

Doctors have advised residents to exercise added caution, ensure they drink clean water and avoid street food in coming days.

Doctors said dengue cases, in particular, have risen significantly, surpassing malaria. “In the last week-and-a-half, I have seen around 10 dengue cases every day. Malaria, however, has played second fiddle, with fewer cases,” said Dr Hemant Thacker, consultant physician, Bhatia Hospital.

The epidemiology cell of the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC), however, said it was natural for monsoon ailments, especially dengue, to rise towards the end of the monsoon, when stagnant water pools are created with intermittent rains. Stagnant water is a breeding ground for mosquitos, some breeds of which are vectors for dengue and malaria.

Municipal records also reflect an increase in dengue cases. While confirmed dengue cases stood at 33 in the first week of September, they rose to 35 in the second week and touched 49 in the third week.

In all, 117 dengue cases have been registered in the city so far this month, which is almost twice the figure in August [65] and July [52]. Cases of viral fever are also on the rise. The civic body recorded 2,705 cases in the third week of September, an increase of more than 300 cases from the second week.

“Apart from these, we are also seeing a number of typhoid and Hepatitis E cases. But, fortunately none of these have been life-threatening. Many patients do need hospitalisation, but not admission to the ICU,” said Dr Pratit Samdani, consultant physician, at Breach Candy Hospital.

Experts said the occurrence of monsoon ailments should start to subside as the monsoon withdraws and with the onset of October heat. “However, we may see more respiratory ailments in October, owing to fluctuations in day and night temperatures and increased humidity,” said Dr Thacker.

First Published: Sep 27, 2014 18:15 IST