Photos | Through the looking glass: Life in lockdown

  • In March 2020, photographers Charlotte Schmitz from Germany and Hannah Yoon of the Philippines launched The Journal (@thejournal_collective), a collective project that aims to showcase work created by women photographers in the pandemic. More than 400 women from over 75 countries have submitted images that capture a take from their own lives in lockdown. Here are a few from this pandemic-era project.
UPDATED ON MAY 09, 2021 03:27 PM IST 7 Photos
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OVER VIEW: “This was taken during the first wave. I had started going out on hikes with a small group of friends. It was nice to escape, get out of the city, get some fresh air, soak up all the nature,” says Samyukta Lakshmi (@samlaks), 42, from Bengaluru. “Earlier going out with friends meant meeting at restaurants, movie theatres, each other’s homes. In the pandemic I found a new way of meeting friends and a new way of seeing the city. In fact, I think I am re-seeing everything — the way light falls at different spots in my house at different times, different new things about my neighbourhood.”(Samyukta Lakshmi)

OVER VIEW: “This was taken during the first wave. I had started going out on hikes with a small group of friends. It was nice to escape, get out of the city, get some fresh air, soak up all the nature,” says Samyukta Lakshmi (@samlaks), 42, from Bengaluru. “Earlier going out with friends meant meeting at restaurants, movie theatres, each other’s homes. In the pandemic I found a new way of meeting friends and a new way of seeing the city. In fact, I think I am re-seeing everything — the way light falls at different spots in my house at different times, different new things about my neighbourhood.”(Samyukta Lakshmi)

UPDATED ON MAY 09, 2021 03:27 PM IST
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RECONCILIATION: “After being apart for six months during the pandemic, my partner Pholo Kimbuende and I were summer road-tripping through Virginia and stopped to cool off at a local swimming spot in the James River, where I took this picture,” says Kate Warren (@gokateshoot), 32, from the US. “Titled Whisper My Sins to Me, it explores racial trauma, representation and reconciliation within my interracial relationship, in the context of the Black Lives Matter movement.”(Kate Warren)

RECONCILIATION: “After being apart for six months during the pandemic, my partner Pholo Kimbuende and I were summer road-tripping through Virginia and stopped to cool off at a local swimming spot in the James River, where I took this picture,” says Kate Warren (@gokateshoot), 32, from the US. “Titled Whisper My Sins to Me, it explores racial trauma, representation and reconciliation within my interracial relationship, in the context of the Black Lives Matter movement.”(Kate Warren)

UPDATED ON MAY 09, 2021 03:27 PM IST
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TWO CONSTANTS: Sahiba Chawdhary (@sahiba_chawdhary) submitted a photograph of her sister and her dog, her two lockdown companions. The siblings started living together again a year ago, after have lived in different cities for over a decade. “We were each other’s constants, and we learnt how to cope with a difficult time,” says the 27-year-old from Delhi. “It’s rather interesting how two siblings can reunite and reconnect as they find each other after years of living apart. It was like we were made to catch up on lost time.”(Sahiba Chawdhary)

TWO CONSTANTS: Sahiba Chawdhary (@sahiba_chawdhary) submitted a photograph of her sister and her dog, her two lockdown companions. The siblings started living together again a year ago, after have lived in different cities for over a decade. “We were each other’s constants, and we learnt how to cope with a difficult time,” says the 27-year-old from Delhi. “It’s rather interesting how two siblings can reunite and reconnect as they find each other after years of living apart. It was like we were made to catch up on lost time.”(Sahiba Chawdhary)

UPDATED ON MAY 09, 2021 03:27 PM IST
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SELF-REFLECTION: “During my self-isolation, I tried to understand what was happening around me and inside me. I began to photograph myself, which helped me document the days in lockdowns and trace my feelings and thoughts and organise them. During that process, photography became a tool for me to hold on to this contradictory and difficult time and to be able to grasp it,” says Marzena Skubatz (@marzenaskubatz), 42, of Germany.(Marzena Skubatz)

SELF-REFLECTION: “During my self-isolation, I tried to understand what was happening around me and inside me. I began to photograph myself, which helped me document the days in lockdowns and trace my feelings and thoughts and organise them. During that process, photography became a tool for me to hold on to this contradictory and difficult time and to be able to grasp it,” says Marzena Skubatz (@marzenaskubatz), 42, of Germany.(Marzena Skubatz)

UPDATED ON MAY 09, 2021 03:27 PM IST
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NEW LIFE: Analia Cid (@analia.cid), 31, of Argentina, submitted an image of her partner Agustín, 31, their cat and his newborn nephew and godson Milo. “Since he was born, Agustín has lived with a heart condition that puts him in the high-risk group for Covid-19. During the first lockdown in Argentina, we were very careful; anything could represent a danger to his health. But on his birthday, in October, his sister and Milo visited us,” Cid says. “I wanted to express the tenderness and vulnerability of the moment. Our societies tend to erase ways of living healthier masculinities from the public view and I think that as photographers, it is our job to show that this is possible. I was also thinking on how much I love these three.”(Analia Cid)

NEW LIFE: Analia Cid (@analia.cid), 31, of Argentina, submitted an image of her partner Agustín, 31, their cat and his newborn nephew and godson Milo. “Since he was born, Agustín has lived with a heart condition that puts him in the high-risk group for Covid-19. During the first lockdown in Argentina, we were very careful; anything could represent a danger to his health. But on his birthday, in October, his sister and Milo visited us,” Cid says. “I wanted to express the tenderness and vulnerability of the moment. Our societies tend to erase ways of living healthier masculinities from the public view and I think that as photographers, it is our job to show that this is possible. I was also thinking on how much I love these three.”(Analia Cid)

UPDATED ON MAY 09, 2021 03:27 PM IST
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OCTOPUS LOCKS: “My daughter’s, thick, thigh-length hair has a presence, a character that is tangible in this picture,” says Claudia Leisinger (@claudialeisinger), 47, of the UK. “It looks and behaves like the tentacles of an octopus and I love how she seems to enjoy this.” The photograph is an invitation to enjoy and embrace parts of ourselves that at times seem uncontrollable, she adds.(Claudia Leisinger)

OCTOPUS LOCKS: “My daughter’s, thick, thigh-length hair has a presence, a character that is tangible in this picture,” says Claudia Leisinger (@claudialeisinger), 47, of the UK. “It looks and behaves like the tentacles of an octopus and I love how she seems to enjoy this.” The photograph is an invitation to enjoy and embrace parts of ourselves that at times seem uncontrollable, she adds.(Claudia Leisinger)

UPDATED ON MAY 09, 2021 03:27 PM IST
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DESPERATE PLEAS: “Stuck at home in the first lockdown, I felt depressed,” says Ranita Roy (@ranita3roy), 27, of Kolkata. “This image is a representation of poor mental health and a desperate plea for the end of the pandemic.”(Ranita Roy)

DESPERATE PLEAS: “Stuck at home in the first lockdown, I felt depressed,” says Ranita Roy (@ranita3roy), 27, of Kolkata. “This image is a representation of poor mental health and a desperate plea for the end of the pandemic.”(Ranita Roy)

UPDATED ON MAY 09, 2021 03:27 PM IST
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