Photos: JaipurPhoto 2018 turns the city into a gallery of images

JaipurPhoto, an international open-air photography festival held every February in the Pink City, offers a curated selection of photography exhibitions staged at various public locations across Jaipur. The visitors are invited to discover its remarkable heritage while visiting the large-format exhibitions, which are often site-specific.

UPDATED ON MAR 01, 2018 05:26 PM IST 11 Photos
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From the series, ‘Angst,’ 2013- 2017, where Soham Gupta makes stark portraits of people who live on the margins of society in Kolkata. This year, both the title and theme of JaipurPhoto take their inspiration from the classic 1966 song by Simon & Garfunkel – ‘Homeward Bound.’ (Courtesy Soham Gupta / JaipurPhoto 2018)

From the series, ‘Angst,’ 2013- 2017, where Soham Gupta makes stark portraits of people who live on the margins of society in Kolkata. This year, both the title and theme of JaipurPhoto take their inspiration from the classic 1966 song by Simon & Garfunkel – ‘Homeward Bound.’ (Courtesy Soham Gupta / JaipurPhoto 2018)

UPDATED ON MAR 01, 2018 05:26 PM IST
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The photography festival makes good use of Jaipur as one of India’s oldest planned cities with several sites of patrimony. The emphasis is on a chance to play with the scale of the city and experiment with installations. (Courtesy Sunil Thakkar / JaipurPhoto 2018)

The photography festival makes good use of Jaipur as one of India’s oldest planned cities with several sites of patrimony. The emphasis is on a chance to play with the scale of the city and experiment with installations. (Courtesy Sunil Thakkar / JaipurPhoto 2018)

UPDATED ON MAR 01, 2018 05:26 PM IST
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From the series, ‘Slash & Burn’ (2015), Abusdal’s work is about a contiguous forest-belt along the Norwegian-Swedish border, where farming families from Finland settled in the early 1600s. These immigrants, called Forest Finns, were “slash-and-burn” farmers – an ancient agricultural method that yielded plentiful crops, but required large forested areas and regular relocation, as it quickly exhausted as the soil. (Courtesy Terje Abusdal / JaipurPhoto 2018)

From the series, ‘Slash & Burn’ (2015), Abusdal’s work is about a contiguous forest-belt along the Norwegian-Swedish border, where farming families from Finland settled in the early 1600s. These immigrants, called Forest Finns, were “slash-and-burn” farmers – an ancient agricultural method that yielded plentiful crops, but required large forested areas and regular relocation, as it quickly exhausted as the soil. (Courtesy Terje Abusdal / JaipurPhoto 2018)

UPDATED ON MAR 01, 2018 05:26 PM IST
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An installation view of Soham Gupta’s ‘Angst’ in Jaipur. (Courtesy Sunil Thakkar / JaipurPhoto 2018)

An installation view of Soham Gupta’s ‘Angst’ in Jaipur. (Courtesy Sunil Thakkar / JaipurPhoto 2018)

UPDATED ON MAR 01, 2018 05:26 PM IST
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‘A Snake That Disappeared Through a Hole in the Wall, 2015-2018’ centres on Tereza Zelenkova’s return to the Czechoslovakian landscapes of her childhood, and to various historical and folkloric sites within it. “I’m more interested in exploring the general poetics – of the Czech-Slovak landscape and stories tied to it – than in archiving individual legends or facts,” Zelenkova said. (Courtesy Tereza Zelenkova / JaipurPhoto 2018)

‘A Snake That Disappeared Through a Hole in the Wall, 2015-2018’ centres on Tereza Zelenkova’s return to the Czechoslovakian landscapes of her childhood, and to various historical and folkloric sites within it. “I’m more interested in exploring the general poetics – of the Czech-Slovak landscape and stories tied to it – than in archiving individual legends or facts,” Zelenkova said. (Courtesy Tereza Zelenkova / JaipurPhoto 2018)

UPDATED ON MAR 01, 2018 05:26 PM IST
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In the series, ‘The Artist and the Photographer,1960s-1970s,’ Prebois presents a selection of Mr. Chand’s (whom he met in the late ‘90s) studio portraits, in which the clients appear to be fully aware of the photographic moment being recorded. The sitters place a disarming amount of trust in the camera, and allow themselves to perform gestures of fondness that would have been unthinkable outside the protective walls of the studio. (Courtesy Christophe Prebois / JaipurPhoto 2018)

In the series, ‘The Artist and the Photographer,1960s-1970s,’ Prebois presents a selection of Mr. Chand’s (whom he met in the late ‘90s) studio portraits, in which the clients appear to be fully aware of the photographic moment being recorded. The sitters place a disarming amount of trust in the camera, and allow themselves to perform gestures of fondness that would have been unthinkable outside the protective walls of the studio. (Courtesy Christophe Prebois / JaipurPhoto 2018)

UPDATED ON MAR 01, 2018 05:26 PM IST
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The organizers were invited by the Government of Rajasthan to conceive of a festival which would allow contemporary photography to engage with heritage sites. Jaipur’s proximity to New Delhi also results in footfalls, especially on the opening weekend. (Courtesy Sunil Thakkar / JaipurPhoto 2018)

The organizers were invited by the Government of Rajasthan to conceive of a festival which would allow contemporary photography to engage with heritage sites. Jaipur’s proximity to New Delhi also results in footfalls, especially on the opening weekend. (Courtesy Sunil Thakkar / JaipurPhoto 2018)

UPDATED ON MAR 01, 2018 05:26 PM IST
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Jaipur presents itself as an exciting city to host these contemporary photographic works because of its inviting heritage and its openness to receiving all kinds of visual art. The exhibitions are printed in a big format that favours a novel approach to the photograph. (Courtesy Sunil Thakkar / JaipurPhoto 2018)

Jaipur presents itself as an exciting city to host these contemporary photographic works because of its inviting heritage and its openness to receiving all kinds of visual art. The exhibitions are printed in a big format that favours a novel approach to the photograph. (Courtesy Sunil Thakkar / JaipurPhoto 2018)

UPDATED ON MAR 01, 2018 05:26 PM IST
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From Nola Minolfi’s ‘The Man Who Never Saw the Sea, 2016-2018,’ is a portrait of the village of Chamois that has ninety inhabitants. The houses are spread across a mountain in the Italian Alps, 1,800 meters above sea level. It is the highest municipality in Italy where cars are not allowed. The only way to get there is by foot, or by cable car. (Courtesy Nola Minolfi / JaipurPhoto 2018)

From Nola Minolfi’s ‘The Man Who Never Saw the Sea, 2016-2018,’ is a portrait of the village of Chamois that has ninety inhabitants. The houses are spread across a mountain in the Italian Alps, 1,800 meters above sea level. It is the highest municipality in Italy where cars are not allowed. The only way to get there is by foot, or by cable car. (Courtesy Nola Minolfi / JaipurPhoto 2018)

UPDATED ON MAR 01, 2018 05:26 PM IST
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From Sebastian Bruno’s ‘Duelos y quebrantos, 2014-2016.’ Bruno travelled 2500 kms into Castilla-La Mancha,the central region of Spain-- the setting for Miguel de Cervantes’ famous novel, Don Quixote de La Mancha. Eighty percent of its surface is flat, the soil is dry, and today most of its inhabitants are elderly people. This project follows in the steps of Don Quixote, through the region. (Courtesy Sebastian Bruno / JaipurPhoto 2018)

From Sebastian Bruno’s ‘Duelos y quebrantos, 2014-2016.’ Bruno travelled 2500 kms into Castilla-La Mancha,the central region of Spain-- the setting for Miguel de Cervantes’ famous novel, Don Quixote de La Mancha. Eighty percent of its surface is flat, the soil is dry, and today most of its inhabitants are elderly people. This project follows in the steps of Don Quixote, through the region. (Courtesy Sebastian Bruno / JaipurPhoto 2018)

UPDATED ON MAR 01, 2018 05:26 PM IST
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Spread across Jantar Mantar, Jawahar Kala Kendra, Hawa Mahal and other public spaces, the festival is in its successful third run. UK-based artist, editor and academic Aaron Schuman, the guest curator of this edition said, “The programme considers the ways in which a wide variety of contemporary photographers explore, express, engage with and examine notions of ‘home’, and how one’s idea of ‘home’ is both determined and defined by ourselves and others.” (Courtesy Sunil Thakkar / JaipurPhoto 2018)

Spread across Jantar Mantar, Jawahar Kala Kendra, Hawa Mahal and other public spaces, the festival is in its successful third run. UK-based artist, editor and academic Aaron Schuman, the guest curator of this edition said, “The programme considers the ways in which a wide variety of contemporary photographers explore, express, engage with and examine notions of ‘home’, and how one’s idea of ‘home’ is both determined and defined by ourselves and others.” (Courtesy Sunil Thakkar / JaipurPhoto 2018)

UPDATED ON MAR 01, 2018 05:26 PM IST

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