Photos: Woman sews bears from clothing of Covid-19 victims in Mexico

PUBLISHED ON JAN 13, 2021 11:30 AM IST
Erendira Guerrero makes stuffed bears for people who lost a family member to Covid-19, using one of the deceased's articles of clothing in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico on January 11. In her small home workshop in this Mexican border city, Guerrero makes these teddy bears so that relatives who have lost a loved one to Covid-19 have something to hold onto.(Christian Chavez / AP)
Shirts of people who died from COVID-19 hang in Erendira Guerrero’s home workshop in Ciudad Juarez on January 11. “Due to COVID-19, many people were left without closure, because they couldn’t say goodbye to their family members,” Guerrero told AP. “They need to close the circle. The bears are helping them.”(Christian Chavez / AP)
Jaime Walfre Aguilar Martinez, whose 50-year-old father died of Covid-19 in November, selects one of his father's favorite sweaters to have a stuffed bear made from the fabric, at his home in Ciudad Juarez on January 11.(Christian Chavez / AP)
Pictures of Jaime Aguilar Rojas, who was 50 when he died of Covid-19 in November, adorn an altar in the home of his son, Jaime Walfre Aguilar Martinez on January 11. Years ago, as Ciudad Juarez suffered jarring levels of violence, Guerrero started making the bears from clothing those victims had worn.(Christian Chavez / AP)
Erendira Guerrero cuts pieces from the shirt of a person who died of Covid-19 as she makes a stuffed bear for one of the deceased's relatives, on January 11. The pandemic has created a new population of distraught customers searching for ways to maintain contact with a loved one taken away suddenly.(Christian Chavez / AP)
Tags ready to be sewn onto bears made for people who lost a loved one to Covid-19, out of one of the deceased's articles of clothing, sit beside a sewing machine in Erendira Guerrero’s home workshop on January 11. She estimates she has made about 200 bears for the families of Covid-19 victims.(Christian Chavez / AP)
Jaime Walfre Aguilar Martinez picks out a tag to have sewn onto the stuffed bear that Erendira Guerrero will make for him from his father's favorite sweater, hanging right, in Guerrero's home workshop on January 11. Guerrero charges about $30 for a bear and attaches notes that sometimes read, “This is a shirt I used to wear, whenever you hold it know that I am there. Love, Dad.”(Christian Chavez / AP)
Araceli Ramirez shows a stuffed bear she had made from the shirt of her father, Lorenzo Ramirez, who died so quickly from Covid-19 two months ago that she was unable to say goodbye, as she stands outside the home of bear maker Erendira Guerrero on January 11.(Christian Chavez / AP)
Araceli Ramirez secures a stuffed bear made from her father Lorenzo Ramizes’ shirt as she leaves the home of bear maker Erendira Guerrero on January 11. “I can talk to the bear, express what I didn’t tell him, and feel like he is with me,” she told AP.(Christian Chavez / AP)

Erendira Guerrero makes stuffed bears for people who lost a family member to Covid-19, using one of the deceased's articles of clothing in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico on January 11. In her small home workshop in this Mexican border city, Guerrero makes these teddy bears so that relatives who have lost a loved one to Covid-19 have something to hold onto. (Christian Chavez / AP)

Shirts of people who died from COVID-19 hang in Erendira Guerrero’s home workshop in Ciudad Juarez on January 11. “Due to COVID-19, many people were left without closure, because they couldn’t say goodbye to their family members,” Guerrero told AP. “They need to close the circle. The bears are helping them.” (Christian Chavez / AP)

Jaime Walfre Aguilar Martinez, whose 50-year-old father died of Covid-19 in November, selects one of his father's favorite sweaters to have a stuffed bear made from the fabric, at his home in Ciudad Juarez on January 11. (Christian Chavez / AP)

Pictures of Jaime Aguilar Rojas, who was 50 when he died of Covid-19 in November, adorn an altar in the home of his son, Jaime Walfre Aguilar Martinez on January 11. Years ago, as Ciudad Juarez suffered jarring levels of violence, Guerrero started making the bears from clothing those victims had worn. (Christian Chavez / AP)

Erendira Guerrero cuts pieces from the shirt of a person who died of Covid-19 as she makes a stuffed bear for one of the deceased's relatives, on January 11. The pandemic has created a new population of distraught customers searching for ways to maintain contact with a loved one taken away suddenly. (Christian Chavez / AP)

Tags ready to be sewn onto bears made for people who lost a loved one to Covid-19, out of one of the deceased's articles of clothing, sit beside a sewing machine in Erendira Guerrero’s home workshop on January 11. She estimates she has made about 200 bears for the families of Covid-19 victims. (Christian Chavez / AP)

Jaime Walfre Aguilar Martinez picks out a tag to have sewn onto the stuffed bear that Erendira Guerrero will make for him from his father's favorite sweater, hanging right, in Guerrero's home workshop on January 11. Guerrero charges about $30 for a bear and attaches notes that sometimes read, “This is a shirt I used to wear, whenever you hold it know that I am there. Love, Dad.” (Christian Chavez / AP)

Araceli Ramirez shows a stuffed bear she had made from the shirt of her father, Lorenzo Ramirez, who died so quickly from Covid-19 two months ago that she was unable to say goodbye, as she stands outside the home of bear maker Erendira Guerrero on January 11. (Christian Chavez / AP)

Araceli Ramirez secures a stuffed bear made from her father Lorenzo Ramizes’ shirt as she leaves the home of bear maker Erendira Guerrero on January 11. “I can talk to the bear, express what I didn’t tell him, and feel like he is with me,” she told AP. (Christian Chavez / AP)

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At a small home workshop in the Mexican border city of Ciudad Juarez, Erendira Guerrero makes teddy bears from the clothing of Covid-19 victims so their relatives have something to hold onto. Years ago, as her city suffered jarring levels of violence, Guerrero started making the bears from clothing those victims had worn. The pandemic has now created a new population of distraught customers searching for ways to maintain contact with a loved one taken away suddenly.

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