Photos: French protesters take to the streets over new security law

UPDATED ON NOV 30, 2020 11:53 AM IST
Demonstrators hold placards as they gather at the Place de la Republique square in Paris on November 28. Tens of thousands took to the streets to protest against new security legislation that would criminalise the publication of images of on-duty police officers with the intent of harming their physical or psychological integrity, AFP reported. (Thomas Coex / AFP)
A demonstrator is seen with a raised arm as a store burns in the background in Paris on November 28. Several fires were started in Paris, sending acrid smoke into the air, as protesters vented their anger against the security law and the rise of institutional racism in the country. (Alain Jocard / AFP)
French riot police officers take cover during the protest in Paris on November 28. Tensions intensified in France after a black music producer Michel Zecler was beaten up by police officers in Paris last weekend. (Alain Jocard / AFP)
An aerial view of demonstrators gathered at the Place de la Republique square in Paris on November 28. Some 46,000 people marched in Paris and 133,000 in total nationwide, the interior ministry said. Protest organisers said some 500,000 joined nationwide, including 200,000 in the capital, AFP reported. (Thomas Coex / AFP)
Demonstrators hold effigies of French President Emmanuel Macron, French Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin and Paris police prefect Didier Lallement at the Place de la Republique in Paris on November 28. Macron said on November 27 that the images of the beating of black music producer Michel Zecler by police officers in Paris “shame us.” The incident had magnified concerns about alleged systemic racism in the police force, AFP reported. (Joel Saget / AFP)
Demonstrators gathered at the Place de la Republique in Paris on November 28. “Police everywhere, justice nowhere” and “police state” and “smile while you are beaten” were among the slogans brandished as protesters marched from Place de la Republique to the nearby Place de la Bastille, AFP reported. (Joel Saget / AFP)
A police officer speaks on a loudspeaker as a car is set on fire by demonstrators in Paris on November 28. An investigation has been opened against the four police personnel involved in the beating of the Black music producer but commentators say that the images -- first published by the Loopsider news site -- may never have been made public if the contentious Article 24 of the security legislation was made law, AFP reported. (Benoit Tessier / REUTERS)
A firefighter tries to extinguish the fire from a car in Paris on November 28. According to Police, several cars, a newspaper kiosk and a brasserie were set on fire close to Place de la Bastille. The Police also complained that protesters impeded fire services from putting out the blazes and said nine people had been detained by the early evening, AFP reported. (Alain Jocard / AFP)
Demonstrators wave the French tricolour during a protest against the new security legislation—Article 24, in Paris on November 28. Article 24 was passed by the National Assembly although it is awaiting Senate approval. (Alain Jocard / AFP)

Demonstrators hold placards as they gather at the Place de la Republique square in Paris on November 28. Tens of thousands took to the streets to protest against new security legislation that would criminalise the publication of images of on-duty police officers with the intent of harming their physical or psychological integrity, AFP reported. (Thomas Coex / AFP)

A demonstrator is seen with a raised arm as a store burns in the background in Paris on November 28. Several fires were started in Paris, sending acrid smoke into the air, as protesters vented their anger against the security law and the rise of institutional racism in the country. (Alain Jocard / AFP)

French riot police officers take cover during the protest in Paris on November 28. Tensions intensified in France after a black music producer Michel Zecler was beaten up by police officers in Paris last weekend. (Alain Jocard / AFP)

An aerial view of demonstrators gathered at the Place de la Republique square in Paris on November 28. Some 46,000 people marched in Paris and 133,000 in total nationwide, the interior ministry said. Protest organisers said some 500,000 joined nationwide, including 200,000 in the capital, AFP reported. (Thomas Coex / AFP)

Demonstrators hold effigies of French President Emmanuel Macron, French Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin and Paris police prefect Didier Lallement at the Place de la Republique in Paris on November 28. Macron said on November 27 that the images of the beating of black music producer Michel Zecler by police officers in Paris “shame us.” The incident had magnified concerns about alleged systemic racism in the police force, AFP reported. (Joel Saget / AFP)

Demonstrators gathered at the Place de la Republique in Paris on November 28. “Police everywhere, justice nowhere” and “police state” and “smile while you are beaten” were among the slogans brandished as protesters marched from Place de la Republique to the nearby Place de la Bastille, AFP reported. (Joel Saget / AFP)

A police officer speaks on a loudspeaker as a car is set on fire by demonstrators in Paris on November 28. An investigation has been opened against the four police personnel involved in the beating of the Black music producer but commentators say that the images -- first published by the Loopsider news site -- may never have been made public if the contentious Article 24 of the security legislation was made law, AFP reported. (Benoit Tessier / REUTERS)

A firefighter tries to extinguish the fire from a car in Paris on November 28. According to Police, several cars, a newspaper kiosk and a brasserie were set on fire close to Place de la Bastille. The Police also complained that protesters impeded fire services from putting out the blazes and said nine people had been detained by the early evening, AFP reported. (Alain Jocard / AFP)

Demonstrators wave the French tricolour during a protest against the new security legislation—Article 24, in Paris on November 28. Article 24 was passed by the National Assembly although it is awaiting Senate approval. (Alain Jocard / AFP)

About The Gallery

Protests erupted in Paris on November 28 as tens of thousands took to the streets to protest against new security legislation—Article 24, with tensions intensified by the police beating and racial abuse of a black man that shocked France. Several cars and stores were set on fire during the protests, sending acrid smoke into the air. French President Emmanuel Macron condemned the alleged systemic racism in the police force. An investigation has been opened against the four police personnel involved in the incident -- first published by the Loopsider news site, which may never have been made public if the contentious Article 24 of the security legislation was made law.

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