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‘Creating a platform for Marathi and Bengali theatre confluence’

Dishari and Nandanik Sanstha, two Pune-based socio-cultural organisations, presented the second edition of ‘Ekti Natya Sondha - An Evening of Bengali Plays’. 

pune Updated: Jul 18, 2017 13:23 IST
Ananya Barua
Ananya Barua
Hindustan Times, Pune
Pune,Bengal,Maharashtra
At the programme, the two Bengali plays, ‘Srimati Bhayankari’ and ‘Buro Shaliker Ghare Rno’ were presented to a mix of Bengali and Marathi audience.(HT PHOTO)

Bengalis in Pune came together to recreate the ambience of community theatre at the Mahatma Phule Sanskrutik Bhavan on the weekend.

Dishari and Nandanik Sanstha, two Pune-based socio-cultural organisations, presented the second edition of ‘Ekti Natya Sondha - An Evening of Bengali Plays’.

“Theatre is a dying art, but in spite of that we are trying to keep it alive among the next generation of probashi bengalis (those living outside of Bengal) and Punekars. Theatre is an integral part of our identity, and so this is very important to take the Bengali theatre movement in Pune ahead,” said Shanta Datta, producer of one the plays presented at the programme.

At the programme, the two Bengali plays, ‘Srimati Bhayankari’ and ‘Buro Shaliker Ghare Rno’ were presented to a mix of Bengali and Marathi audience. As the chief guest of the event, police commissioner Rashmi Shukla said, “It’s true that I don’t understand the language, but I will try my best. Pune as a cosmopolitan city has a good population of Bengalis, and I will do my best to join them in upcoming festivities in the month of September.”

The event will be a platform for Marathi and Bengali theatre confluence, Datta added,“There exists many commonalities in Marathi and Bangla theatre, and we are trying to bridge the gap through different avenues of collaborative contribution to the art of theatre. We dream of having a drama festival here, calling in different groups from Bengal and all parts of Maharashtra,” Datta added.

Adding on to this discourse, renowned Marathi theatre artist Atul Pethe, as the guest of honour, said, “I have grown up with Bengali theatre and films, and have realised over the years that Maharashtra and Bengal has a strong brotherhood, politically, culturally and socially. Therefore, a communion to be established between Marathi and Bengali theatre is very important, so that the great work done in both the languages can be translated and performed.” Voicing his desire to work with the two organisations, he added, “It would be an honour for me, to hopefully, someday, direct a play for Dishari and Nandanik Sanstha.”

Srimati Bhayankari, a play directed by Goutam Roy, presented an Indian adaptation of Shakespeare’s ‘Taming the Shrew’. The second play, ‘Buro Shaliker Ghare Rno’ directed by Shiladitya Roy, reiterated the Michael Madhusudan Dutt’s1860 satire on feudal Bengal under the grip of colonialism, with several social evils like casteism and communalism in the backdrop.

According to Shiladitya Roy, “Pune audience is very vibrant and accepting of new kinds of theatre, and so presenting such a play on this platform in Pune, is befitting.”