29 killed in bomb blasts as Nigerian leader says US hampering fight

Updated on Jul 28, 2015 01:31 AM IST
Bomb blasts, beleived to be the work of Boko Haram, killed 29 people in Nigeria and 24 in Cameroon, officials said on Thursday after Nigeria's new president warned that the US refusal to sell his country strategic weapons is "aiding and abetting" the Islamic extremist group.
AP | By, Lagos, Nigeria

Bomb blasts, beleived to be the work of Boko Haram, killed 29 people in Nigeria and 24 in Cameroon, officials said on Thursday after Nigeria's new president warned that the US refusal to sell his country strategic weapons is "aiding and abetting" the Islamic extremist group.

Nigeria's National Emergency Management Agency called on Thursday for urgent blood donations to treat 105 wounded people, according to spokesperson Sani Datti.

He said at least 29 bodies have been recovered at two bustling bus stations in northeastern Gombe town - the latest targets in a campaign that has spilled across Nigeria's borders.

In neighboring Cameroon, two suicide bombers on Wednesday killed at least 22 people at a marketplace near the border, officials said. The toll is likely to rise among the 50 injured, they said.

Nigeria's President Muhammadu Buhari returned home on Thursday to the capital, Abuja, from a four-day visit to the US where he was warmly received by President Barack Obama, but failed to get all he wanted.

Buhari told policy makers at the US Institute for Peace on Wednesday that Nigeria's armed forces are "largely impotent" because they do not possess the appropriate weapons to fight Boko Haram.

He urged the US president, Congress and government to be more flexible about the Leahy Law that prohibits certain weapon sales to countries whose military are accused of gross human rights violations.

Amnesty International charges Nigeria's military is responsible for the deaths of 8,000 detainees - twice as many as Boko Haram's victims in the first four years of its 6-year-old insurgency.

"The application of the Leahy Law ... has aided and abetted the Boko Haram terrorist group in the prosecution of its extremist ideology and hate, the indiscriminate killings and maiming of civilians," Buhari said.

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