Lyari Notes: An Indo-Pak documentary film to spread peace | art and culture | Hindustan Times
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Lyari Notes: An Indo-Pak documentary film to spread peace

Lyari Notes, a documentary that traces the lives of four girls in Karachi, is made by an Indian and a Pakistani filmmaker.

art and culture Updated: Oct 14, 2016 08:34 IST
Ruchika Garg
A still from the documentary Lyari Notes.
A still from the documentary Lyari Notes.

In the present times, anything related to Pakistan is being banned or slammed. This includes the artists who were invited to perform here and the films which were to be screened at festivals in the city. At one particular film festival, however, the Pakistani film will be showcased, as scheduled — since the fest highlights the need for peace.

To propagate the message of non-violence, Ekta Foundation Trust, International Gandhian Initiative for Non-violence and Peace, and Enable India Foundation have organised the Peace Builders International Film Festival in the Capital. 23 short films, documentaries, animated films, and fictions are being premiered at the festival highlighting the contribution of women in non-violence.

Lyari Notes, a documentary based on the narrative of four young girls is set in Karachi and is directed by Maheen Zia and Miriam Chandy from Pakistan and India respectively. Anupama Srinivasan, festival co-director says, “The idea behind showcasing Lyari Notes as the concluding film is to tell people that both countries can go hand in hand and work together. In the documentary four girls from Karachi learnt music, so it also highlights a positive image of the country and a change a perception.”

She refuses to comment on Pakistani movies being banned at almost every other film festival in the Capital. “I don’t want to say anything about it. People have different point of views. I believe that any conflict can be solved at the round table conference,” says Srinivasan.

The film’s co-director who is from Pakistan, was also invited to cross over the border and talk about the film, but the organisers decided against it at the last minute. “Due to the ongoing tussle between two countries, we thought it prudent to not invite her right now. But we hope that the peace between two countries grow,” says Aaradhana Kohli Kapur, festival co-director.