Eid-al-Adha 2018: History and significance of Bakrid

On the occasion of Eid-al-Adha, a sheep or goat is sacrificed to commemorate Prophet Ibrahim (Abraham’s) willingness to sacrifice his son according to God’s command.
Muslims buy new clothes and go to pray in mosques, where they thank Allah for all His blessings.(Shutterstock)
Muslims buy new clothes and go to pray in mosques, where they thank Allah for all His blessings.(Shutterstock)
Updated on Aug 22, 2018 02:11 PM IST
Copy Link
Hindustan Times, Delhi | ByKabir Bhandari

Eid-al-Adha, also known as the ‘festival of sacrifice’, is the second most significant festival in the Islamic calendar. On Eid-al-Adha, a sheep or goat is sacrificed to commemorate Prophet Ibrahim (Abraham’s) willingness to sacrifice his son according to God’s command.

Muslims buy new clothes and go to pray in mosques, where they thank Allah for all His blessings.

Usually, a goat or sheep is sacrificed after the namaz. The meat is divided into three parts and is distributed amongst family members, relatives and friends and the poor. Presents are also exchanged among family and friends on this occasion.

 

The Haj, in which Muslims go to Mecca in Saudi Arabia on pilgrimage, culminates with Eid-al-Adha. It is believed that Eid is a day of victory and the one who is successful in his spiritual growth receives Eid with a victorious spirit. He, who observes all his duties faithfully, which are associated with Eid, is triumphant. It proves that he has control over his desires and leads a disciplined life.

Haj is one of the five pillars of Islam. A Muslim who is physically and financially able is expected to perform Haj. The pilgrims who go to Mecca are known as Hajjis. Pilgrims wear simple clothes called Ihram to signify that in the eyes of Allah, everyone is equal.

Follow @htlifeandstyle for more

SHARE THIS ARTICLE ON
Close Story
SHARE
Story Saved
OPEN APP
×
Saved Articles
Following
My Reads
Sign out
New Delhi 0C
Sunday, December 05, 2021