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Home / Chandigarh / Guru Nanak’s teachings transcend boundaries: CJI

Guru Nanak’s teachings transcend boundaries: CJI

Legal luminaries from Bhutan, Sri Lanka attended the programme

chandigarh Updated: Feb 02, 2020 00:34 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times, Chandigarh
Chief Justice of India Sharad Arvind Bobde (centre) felicitating philanthropist SPS Oberoi as environmentalist Balbir Singh Seechewal (extreme left) looks on during the international conference  on ‘Philosophy of Guru Nanak Dev and its relevance today in equity, social justice and environment’ at Gymnasium Hall in Panjab University on Saturday.
Chief Justice of India Sharad Arvind Bobde (centre) felicitating philanthropist SPS Oberoi as environmentalist Balbir Singh Seechewal (extreme left) looks on during the international conference on ‘Philosophy of Guru Nanak Dev and its relevance today in equity, social justice and environment’ at Gymnasium Hall in Panjab University on Saturday. (Anil Dayal/HT)

Chief Justice of India Sharad Arvind Bobde said Sikhism founder Guru Nanak’s teachings do not only belong exclusively to Punjab, but transcend all man-made boundaries.

Justice Bobde was on his maiden visit to the city to address an international conference on ‘Philosophy of Guru Nanak Dev and its relevance today in equity, social justice and environment’ at Panjab University (PU).

The two-day conference is being organised by the Bar Council of Punjab and Haryana and Bar Council of India, with participation of Supreme Court judges from countries including India, Bhutan and Sri Lanka.

“Guru Nanak and his philosophies do not belong exclusively to Punjab or the Sikh religion but his persona and teachings have gifted pearls of sanity and wisdom to the entire world that transcend all man-made boundaries,” justice Bobde said.

The CJI also said that if people followed Guru Nanak’s message on protection of environment and ecology, the country would not have faced the environmental crisis we are suffering from today. Terming him a rationalist, the CJI said he championed the cause of equality.

Nanak’s views about women were far ahead of his times and he formed a democratic congregation where single, married and widowed women were welcome.

Addressing law students and lawyers, justice Bobde said that they should realise the extent to which Guru Nanak’s basic philosophy runs through the first couple of chapters of the Indian Constitution and the Preamble ‘which we are sworn to uphold’.

The CJI said Guru Nanak left the foremost lesson behind for his followers which was feeding masses through ‘langar’ (community meal), for which the Sikh community is commended throughout the world.

The CJI also released a book ‘The First Sikh - The Life and Legacy of Sri Guru Nanak Dev Ji’ written by UK author-cum-professor Nikki Guninder.

Environmentalist Balbir Singh Seechewal, businessman SPS Oberoi, journalist Baljit Balli and poet Surjit Pattar were honoured at the conference.

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