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Hospitals report vaccine shortage, residents worried over second dose

Hospitals across the city are reporting a shortage of vaccines, due to which residents who have taken the first jab are concerned over the non-availability as they have to take the second jab within the stipulated time frame
By Leena Dhankhar, Gurugram
PUBLISHED ON APR 25, 2021 11:21 PM IST

Hospitals across the city are reporting a shortage of vaccines, due to which residents who have taken the first jab are concerned over the non-availability as they have to take the second jab within the stipulated time frame.

Multi-speciality hospitals across the city said they are awaiting vaccine supply, with some not having received stock for four days. Many residents also took to social media expressing their concerns over the delay in getting vaccinated.

Dr Vikram Singh, director of Aarvy hospital, located in Civil Lines and Sector 90, said that they have not received vaccines for the last four days. “There has been an acute shortage of vaccines. People are following up for their second jab, but they are unable to get them,” he said.

Representatives of a private hospital in Sector 56 said they are struggling to get the supply of vaccines, while Artemis Hospitals has halted vaccination drives in residential societies and offices due to low stock.

“The pace of vaccination has slowed down due to problems in supply of vaccines. Vaccination drive in residential societies and corporates/workplaces has been put on halt temporarily. We are hopeful that with the help of district administration we will soon overcome glitches and have our community vaccinated,” said Dr Anjali Kaul, medical superintendent, Artemis Hospitals Gurugram.

In Gurugram, the vaccination drive is being conducted in 89 hospitals, including 37 government health centres and 52 private hospitals, said officials.

However, officials of the health department refuted the allegations and said that sufficient doses of vaccines are available, even as private hospitals have put up messages outside vaccination rooms over the process being on hold due to non-availability of stock. Officials said that if the hospital where residents took their first shot does not have stock, they can take the second vaccine shot at another facility where stock is available.

Officials said that the hospitals are getting the supply as per their demands on a daily basis. The district is replenishing its stock every three to four days, with no fixed quota, said officials.

Dr MP Singh, district immunisation officer, said, “Sufficient vaccine doses, over 25,000, are currently available with the health department. The health department provides doses as per the requirement of the hospitals to avoid any vaccine wastage or stocking up of vials. In one particular case, the hospital concerned failed to provide the required doses, based on the footfall of vaccine beneficiaries.”

The footfall of people turning up for vaccinations has increased due to the recent spikes in Covid-19 cases.

On Sunday, 2,591 people received the first dose of vaccine, while 2,526 people took the second jab across session sites, said officials. So far, 464,840 have received vaccines, said officials.

Senior citizens are concerned that they might have to restart the vaccination process if they are unable to take the vaccine doses on time.

The Centre has recommended a gap of six to eight weeks between the two doses of Covishield vaccine, while a gap of four to six weeks is recommended for the Covaxin vaccine.

Vimla Devi, (75), a resident of DLF Phase-3, said that she was due to take her second vaccine shot between April 15 and 25, but is waiting to do so as the hospital is yet to receive its stock. “I have been checking with the hospital for the last three days, but there is no supply,” she said.

“I am worried now as there will be a rush in all hospitals after May 1 and with the current shortage of vaccines, those who need it will be ignored,” said Murti Sharma, a resident of Sector 54, who has been following up with a hospital in Sushant Lok-1 over vaccine shortage.

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