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Home / Pune News / On study leave, Pune cub doctor comes home and masters the lesson of service

On study leave, Pune cub doctor comes home and masters the lesson of service

Dr Charuta Shrotriya has been volunteering for Covid-19 treatment along with her two doctor friends since March at the PMC-run Naidu Infectious Diseases Hospital

pune Updated: May 28, 2020 16:16 IST
Prachi Bari
Prachi Bari
Hindustan Times, Pune
(From left) Dr Ravisha More, Dr Aditya Lal, Dr Vitansha Lamba and Dr Charuta Shrotriya at Naidu hospital.
(From left) Dr Ravisha More, Dr Aditya Lal, Dr Vitansha Lamba and Dr Charuta Shrotriya at Naidu hospital. (HT/PHOTO)

For Dr Charuta Shrotriya, her visit home from Kolkata has turned into a mission that is part of her profession. The 26-year-old has been volunteering for Covid-19 treatment along with her two doctor friends since March at the PMC-run Naidu Infectious Diseases Hospital.

“I am working with Dr Ravisha More and Dr Aditya Lal, my 2017 batchmates of Bharati Vidyapeeth Medical College Pune. I am doing my post-graduation in Ophthalmology from Kolkata and had visited home in March for a few days and the lockdown was imposed,” said Dr Charuta.

Dr Lal, who was approached by Pune Municipal Corporation (PMC) to set up a quarantine zone, contacted Dr Charuta and the latter agreed after convincing her concerned family.

“I could not fathom sitting at home doing nothing when can of be of help. My intentions behind volunteering were just that — help out in any way I could since it was my duty as a doctor to do something because Pune was one of the cities worst-hit by Covid-19,” said Dr Charuta, while examining people at Naidu that sees a lot of patients every day.

At Naidu, she works in the flu outpatient department and also visits the wards where patients are admitted. “We evaluate patients’ symptoms and decide treatment accordingly. We see 60-70 patients every day,” she said.

Dr Charu said that her family were initially against her volunteering as two high-risk members, her grandparents, live in the house. “My Dad agreed and we devised a preventive measure before I started visiting the hospital. My only fear is that family should not suffer because of my decision. So far, it is going on well,” she said.

She works at Naidu for nine hours, except on Sunday. “The staff her are helpful and kind-hearted, especially Dr Sudhir Patsute, the medical superintendent, and resident medical officer Dr Namrata Chandanshiv.” She said that her experience will benefit her career.

“The best part of the day is when we discharge suspected patients when they test negative. The happiness on their faces is incomparable. With hospitals nearing capacity, many times patients are not admitted because there is not enough beds. I feel sad for their plight. We do our best to ensure they can be accommodated in some medical centre. Patients who are caught in this cycle of referral sometimes threaten us but we deal with them calmly. We had one deceased positive patient’s son who demanded answers and threatened to end his life. We had a patient who became violent because he didn’t want to stay admitted. Our head personally meet them and address their concerns,” she said.

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