After Varanasi, Ganga water turns green in Prayagraj

Published on May 31, 2021 12:26 AM IST

Scientists cite bloom of microcystis algae as a possible cause behind colour change of river water After Varanasi, now water of Ganga in Prayagraj has turned green

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By, Prayagraj

Scientists cite bloom of microcystis algae as a possible cause behind colour change of river water

After Varanasi, now water of Ganga in Prayagraj has turned green. Most residents of Sangam city residing in localities close to the banks of Ganga have noticed this change in colour in the past two days. But on Sunday, the Ganga right from Rasoolabad to Sangam has donned a green hue.

The water at Rasulabad Ghat is noticeably green and muddy. However, the water of the national river at Phaphamau is bearing the green tinge and this hue can be spotted even at Shivkuti, Salori and Daraganj areas. This change in colour has also been noticed by the scientists who cite algal bloom as a possible cause behind it.

Prof Grijesh Kumar, coordinator of Allahabad University’s Centre of Environmental Studies said that the greenish appearance of the river could be due to microcystis algae.

“Speaking on the basis of just visual observation, the change of colour appears to be because of the algae named microcystis, which is found in stagnant water. The fact that water of Ganga is almost still these days could have resulted in the algal bloom,” he said.

Another possible explanation could be that the algae might have come from some drains or stagnant source during the recent rains that have lashed the area, said Prof Kumar.

Noted botanist Prof DK Chauhan of AU said the algae in Ganga could be due to increased nutrients in the water as phosphate, sulphur and nitrate are known nutrients that help it grow and these nutrients could come from sewage during the rains sparking the process of photosynthesis with the help of sunlight.

He however said that it was a natural process seen between March and May if conditions permit and the algae would disappear as the flow of the river water gains pace. However, he did warn that if condition persists for long duration, it can prove harmful for fishes and drinking this water could prove harmful for both man and animals.

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  • ABOUT THE AUTHOR

    K Sandeep Kumar is a Special Correspondent of Hindustan Times heading the Allahabad Bureau. He has spent over 16 years reporting extensively in Uttar Pradesh, especially Allahabad and Lucknow. He covers politics, science and technology, higher education, medical and health and defence matters. He also writes on development issues.

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