Lack of BSc courses in evening colleges disappoints Delhi students

Dean of Students’ Welfaresaid that science practicals at the university can run up to four hours each day, which is a lot of time and that could be one of the reasons why these colleges did not have any science courses.
Despite being situated on the same premises, there is a stark difference between the facilities provided by day and evening colleges.(Sanchit Khanna/HT Photo/ Representative image)
Despite being situated on the same premises, there is a stark difference between the facilities provided by day and evening colleges.(Sanchit Khanna/HT Photo/ Representative image)
Updated on Jun 17, 2019 12:06 PM IST
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Hindustan Times, New Delhi | ByHT Correspondent

While the registration dates for admission to Delhi University have been extended, students looking to pursue science courses in evening colleges are in for a disappointment— none of the eight evening colleges under the university offer any BSc programme, except Pannalal Girdharlal Dayanand Anglo-Vedic (PGDAV) college, which only offers a BSc (H) in Mathematics, but no other BSc course.

Ravi Wadhwa, an administrative official of PGDAV College, said the idea behind evening colleges was to provide basic education to working students, and perhaps that’s why the necessary infrastructure required to support science courses was not created. “That is no longer the aim. The college hours and cutoffs have increased over the years, leaving little difference between morning and evening colleges. If there are lab facilities, students might be able to avail science courses,” he added.

Dean of Students’ Welfare Rajeev Gupta said that science practicals at the university can run up to four hours each day, which is a lot of time (evening colleges run for shorter durations) and that could be one of the reasons why these colleges did not have any science courses. Registrar Tarun Das did not respond to calls and messages for a comment.

Vipin Aggarwal, principal of Sri Aurobindo College, too emphasised on the lack of time being one of the major reasons.

“Science courses require more time. Evening colleges are run in a shorter span of time so it is difficult to run science courses here. I would rather recommend opening more colleges instead of offering science courses in evening colleges, so that students can study the subjects they want.”

National Students Union of India, Delhi, president Akshay Lakra said that evening colleges have mostly been a secondary option for students.

“Since these are mostly off campus colleges, they don’t provide the campus life students often seek. Besides, most such colleges do not even have the infrastructure to support professional courses,” he said.

He added that despite being situated on the same premises, there was a stark difference between the facilities provided by day and evening colleges.

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Friday, December 03, 2021