?Bouts of diaorrheoa can cause cataract?

IF YOUR child suffers from repeated bouts of diaorrheoa and dysentery, do not take it lightly as these could lead to an early cataract formation in his/her eyes on attaining adulthood.

india Updated: Feb 13, 2006 14:10 IST

IF YOUR child suffers from repeated bouts of diaorrheoa and dysentery, do not take it lightly as these could lead to an early cataract formation in his/her eyes on attaining adulthood.

Some recent studies have shown that there is a link between early onset of cataract and episodes of diaorrheoa and dysentery suffered during childhood.

“Though still unsubstantiated, the studies do hold certain grounds and further research is being carried out,” says one of India’s leading ophthalmologists Dr Mahipal S Sachdev (MBBS, MD).

Hailing from New Delhi and an alumnus of All-India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Dr Sachdev was in town to attend the 64th All India Ophthalmological Conference `Antar Drishti 2006’ at Minto Hall.

Talking to Hindustan Times today, he said there were four main factors for cataract formation. “Protein calorie malnutrition, number of episodes of diaorrheoa and dysentery in childhood, increased exposure to sunlight and UV rays, and genetic reasons were mainly responsible for cataract,” he said.

Dr Sachdev, who is chairman, medical director and senior consultant ophthalmology at New Delhi’s ‘Centre for Sight’ stated almost 50-60 per cent of blindness in India is caused due to cataract.

However, he added newer techniques and innovations in the field were signs of great hope for patients. “Phakic intraocular lens and epilasik surgery were new hopes for patients with myopia up to minus 12 and minus 14 and hypermetropia up to plus 6,” he said.

Dr Sachdev, who specialises in conditions of anterior part of eye including cornea, cataract, contact lenses and refractive surgery (laser vision correction), said his centre had pioneered the wave front guided lasik surgery and epilasik surgery in the country.

“We have been performing these advanced surgeries for past some years now,” he stated.Emphasising advances in all kinds of surgeries across the world aimed at reducing the size of

incision and thereby speeding rehabilitation, Dr Sachdev asserted new advances in ophthalmic surgery were also on the same line. “Phako-emulsification technique involves a no-injection, no-stitch and no-pad surgery,” he pointed out.

Saying that size of incision in cataract surgery had been significantly reduced to barely one mm from previous 3.2 mm, Dr Sachdev added rollable lenses were replacing foldable lenses now. “Since the lens can be rolled, it requires a very minute incision to slip it into the operated eye,” he said.

He added due to advances in techniques of cataract surgery like smaller incisions, the curvatural changes and damage to corneal tissue had been reduced significantly while the healing period had been considerably expedited.

First Published: Feb 13, 2006 14:10 IST