DGP faces uphill task on law & order front | india | Hindustan Times
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DGP faces uphill task on law & order front

?I WON?T change, you will have to change.? This is the terse message of director general of police (DGP) Bua Singh to a corrupt lobby of officers in the State police. He has given a clear signal to the district police chiefs all over the State to either perform or face the music.

india Updated: Apr 19, 2006 01:11 IST
M Hasan

“I WON’T change, you will have to change.” This is the terse message of director general of police (DGP) Bua Singh to a corrupt lobby of officers in the State police. He has given a clear signal to the district police chiefs all over the State to either perform or face the music.

With police stations having a high price tag, posting of inspectors and station house officers has become a “roaring business” for SPs and SSPs. There is a feeling among top police officers that without stopping the “auction” of police stations, an improvement in the crime situation will remain a far cry.

Though the DGP has given a month to control the rising crime graph, “it is not enough to clean up the mess in the police at the district level”, said a DIG. With the law and order problem continuing to haunt the State Government, Chief Minister Mulayam Singh Yadav has reportedly directed the DGP to ensure “visible improvement” before the assembly elections.

Though Bua Singh was given charge of the State police because of his no-nonsense image, he faces an uphill task. There is a vicious nexus among lower-rank police officers, politicians and criminals that has become a major hurdle in crime control. Some IPS officers hankering for “lucrative field posts by hook or by crook” have basically surrendered their authority to the SHOs and others at the thana level. Direct political intervention in transfer and posting of these SHOs has made the situation murky. “Even the district police chief cannot transfer SHOs without the nod of local politicians,” regretted an officer. “It is also a problem of right people not being in the right places in the districts,” said the officer.

A large number of good young IPS officers are rusting in “Siberian posts”. Moreover, the “cop-criminal” nexus has further worsened the situation.