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Dream sequence almost reality: Roddick

Andy Roddick is on the verge of living out a dream he first had as a young visitor to the US Open.

india Updated: Sep 07, 2003 12:07 IST
Reuters
Reuters
PTI

Andy Roddick is on the verge of living out a dream he first had as a young visitor to the US Open.

The American fourth seed beat Argentine David Nalbandian 6-7 3-6 7-6 6-1 6-3 in the semi-finals of the season's last grand slam on Saturday, setting up a final against Spaniard Juan Carlos Ferrero.

"I'm excited ... I came here so many times as a fan when I was younger and I can't believe I'm actually in the final now," Roddick said.

"But it would be nice to go one step further.

"I have always said that if I had to pick a grand slam to win, it would be the US Open.

"It's more special if it's in your home country."

It will be 21-year-old Roddick's first grand slam final appearance, making up for semi-final defeats at the Australian Open and Wimbledon earlier this year.

But facing match point in the third set tiebreak, a win looked beyond him.

"If this had all happened a year ago, I probably would have freaked out a bit," he said.

"But now I can keep things under control, or on an even keel.

"The breaker was the turning point ... to come through the match point gave me a new life.

"I was pretty much down-and-out, so I just decided to go for it."

Nalbandian complained that, being American, Roddick was given the benefit of the doubt whenever there was a close call.

"In the first two sets there was a whole bunch of calls on the line, but they were the right calls," Roddick said.

"It's not like I was given calls on the line, I think that's absurd.

"The umpires do their job, just as we do. Obviously ... he saw things a different way."

Roddick did lose his temper with the chair umpire, telling him to "step up" during the third set.

"I wasn't complaining just to complain," Roddick said.

The rain delays this week and re-jigged schedules mean that Ferrero and Roddick have roughly 24 hours to prepare for Sunday's final.

"I don't have to play an entire tournament," Roddick said.

"I have one more match to go.

"But I'll hydrate myself, get a lot of food, a lot of sleep and come out. This is giant for me because it gives me a chance to win a grand slam."

First Published: Sep 07, 2003 12:07 IST