Gulzar ?blames? Ash for Kajrare... rage | india | Hindustan Times
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Gulzar ?blames? Ash for Kajrare... rage

IT TAKES a great no less than Gulzar to disown a stupendous success. ?Don?t blame me for making Kajrare the great rage that it came to be. The credit is due all to the beauty of Aishwarya,? said the maverick lyricist who has fascinated the classes and masses alike since his debut in Bandini (Don?t forget the exquisite Mora gora ang layi le even as you hum O humdum). ?It?s the music first that makes a song click and the success of the written word is in how close it came to the composition,? is his modest stand.

india Updated: Jun 11, 2006 00:01 IST

IT TAKES a great no less than Gulzar to disown a stupendous success. “Don’t blame me for making Kajrare the great rage that it came to be. The credit is due all to the beauty of Aishwarya,” said the maverick lyricist who has fascinated the classes and masses alike since his debut in Bandini (Don’t forget the exquisite Mora gora ang layi le even as you hum O humdum). “It’s the music first that makes a song click and the success of the written word is in how close it came to the composition,” is his modest stand.

Gulzar is in town to take part in a Hindi-Urdu mushaira under the aegis of UP Hindi-Urdu Sahitya Award Committee to commemorate the work of poet laureate Kaifi Azmi. “It’s a very interesting phase of experimentation that we are passing through where cinema is concerned,” said the man for every season, the poet for every reason. He expressed admiration for how Bunty and Babli sell the Taj to not just a character in the film but to a large number of cine-goers too.

“I’ve taken a break only to learn this new genre, the new language in which films are being told. These are films that have no story and images are doing all the talking,” he observed, adding, “There’s no last word in fine art and I am sure this phase will pass and make way for a glorious future.”

From among the recent films it was Paheli that charmed the writer—if only Amol Palekar had taken better care with the climax—and Sujit Sircar of Yahaan who impressed him for the “most honest and humane treatment of the Kashmir issue.” He admitted to have loved Rang De Basanti for the thought provoking narrative and the message exhorting all to do their bit and make the world a better place.

“I am anything but a mentor to my daughter Meghna,” he said, before surprising with the revelation that she has learned the art of filmmaking from Saeed Mirza.

“But I loved her film Filhaal for the sensitive depiction of a bold story idea. When I make a comeback to moviemaking, it would be a leap from all my previous films just as Maachis and Hu Tu Tu were from all my past work,” said the director of classics like Aandhi, Parichay, Khushboo, Kinara and the National Award winning Mere Apne. He attributes his success to moulding himself according to the demands of the film industry.

His association with Lucknow, he says, is fond and it is with pride he accepts the compliment that his brand of Urdu is Lakhnawi.

“It is such a beautiful city! I went for a spin around town just to soak in its charm. Make it cleaner and keep these monuments as timelessly beautiful as they are,” was his parting shot.