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Intellect vs sentiment

A child is hit by a vehicle on the road and falls unconscious. The driver rushes to the child, picks him up and takes him to the hospital. He provides best care and spends money for a few days. In the end, whether the child survives or dies, he takes it equally because he is not attached to him. Ravindra Kumar writes.

india Updated: Sep 12, 2011 00:04 IST
Ravindra Kumar

A child is hit by a vehicle on the road and falls unconscious. The driver rushes to the child, picks him up and takes him to the hospital. He provides best care and spends money for a few days. In the end, whether the child survives or dies, he takes it equally because he is not attached to him.

King David of the time of "first testament" was challenged by his son for the power of the throne and rebelled against him. The king accepted the challenge. He fought valiantly and killed his son in a battle. Later he wept a lot for the death of his son because he loved him naturally. This is one of the best examples to see a man having balance between intellect and sentiments.

Carl Gustav Jung, the great philosopher, wrote in The Man and his Symbols that acquiring a balance between masculinity and femininity is judged by the equanimity he has achieved between intellect and sentiments. Such a person is a yogi known as "hermaphrodite" in the Western myth and 'ardhanaareeshwar' in the Eastern myth. Such a person has symptoms of both man and woman on the face and in actions. Combination of Shiva and Shakti in a single statue in Indian temples depicts the same. The face of mythical Sophia in West says the same thing.

As soon as a person acquires intellectual property of man and sentimental property of woman, he or she is supposed to have equanimity with which one takes equally the opposites like heat and cold, honour and dishonour, gain and loss and so on. With regular practice, one can achieve such a goal and have the same spiritual result as the one through yoga or mental concentration. Jung called this process as "Individuation" after which one is free from the shackles of this world.

Such a wise person functions appropriately in the world, though inwardly he is free of all need to conform. As long as the body exists, pain is painful and pleasure is pleasant. But the wise is not attached to either. -www.quantumsoulaware.com