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Jaswant tells all to PM

Former external affairs minister Jaswant Singh has disclosed the name of the US mole in the PMO during the P V Narasimha Rao regime to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh.
None | By HT Correspondent and PTI, New Delhi
PUBLISHED ON JUL 30, 2006 01:12 AM IST

Sangh slams him for silence

Former external affairs minister Jaswant Singh has disclosed the name of the US mole in the PMO during the P V Narasimha Rao regime to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh.

“I had requested for personal time with the PM twice but there was no response. Therefore yesterday I sent the entire text of the letter to him, with no names omitted, no details removed. The letter has been with him for the past 24 hours now. It is upto him to do whatever is right in the national interest," Singh said on Saturday during the function to release his book A Call of Honour.
"The letter has been with him for the past 24 hours now. It is upto him to do whatever is right in the national interest," he added.

"I have never used the word 'mole', even in the book. However, it generated so much excitement and the Prime Minister charged me with lacking in decency. He is a big man, he can use big words, but I find it difficult to assume the idioms of an akhara in a village," Singh said.

He also criticised, what he called, India's "subservient" US policy, saying, "We have to stop being dewy-eyed about the United States. The US objective to shackle India's nuclear capability remains constant."

"Being natural allies with the US does not mean being naturally subservient to US interests," reasoned Singh.

However, Jaswant came in for a sharp attack from RSS mouthpiece Panchjanya for not naming the mole. The publication asked him to explain why he had kept secret the identity of a spy who should have been "hanged in public".

"It's hard to understand why Jaswant Singh, a top leader of a party reputed internationally as a Hindu nationalist and a pro-Hindutva party, did not reveal for so long that there was a mole in the Prime Minister's Office," said an article in the weekly.

Singh has been asked how he would describe the spy — as a patriot or a traitor.

"If that spy is a traitor, why should he be allowed the right to life in India? And why has this right been given to that person for the past ten years by remaining silent?" the article said. The BJP, which has been silent on the issue, also came in for criticism. "This nationalist party should have hanged that spy publicly (when it was in power) ," the weekly stated.

The Sangh organ was also unhappy over Singh's apparent praise of senior US officials in Clinton administration. "Singh does appear somewhat critical of US policies, but his overwhelming expressions, as a leader of a nationalist party, of American officials in the Clinton administration create a strange distaste," it observed. It also disapproved of what it called Singh's cautious attempts to blame the Congress for Pakistan founder Mohammad Ali Jinnah's pro-Partition moves.

"He has tried to create an impression that Jinnah became anti-Hindu and an advocate of partition because of the Congress.We may be criticising the Congress for the damage it has done to the country, but when it comes to its comparison with Jinnah, we will treat the Congress, which is an Indian political party, as our own," the article said.

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