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LEVEL FIVE

Level Five explores the interactions between history, memory and the visual image. It traces a woman?s obsessive odyssey as she reconstructs a video game left unfinished by her deceased lover.
PTI | By HT Correspondent
PUBLISHED ON JUL 20, 2003 08:10 PM IST

LEVEL FIVE
France, 1996
Director: Chris Marker

Level Five explores the interactions between history, memory and the visual image. It traces a woman’s obsessive odyssey as she reconstructs a video game left unfinished by her deceased lover.

He was a computer artist, she is a writer, and their relationship, once lived away from the television screen, is now housed wholly within it. The subject of the game: the Battle of Okinawa in the twilight of World War II.

To finish the game, a player must scrupulously re-create every last detail of the war through cyber-imagery: the newsreels, the bombings, the mass suicides.

Cinematography:
Chris Marker

Music:

Michel Krasna

Principal cast:

Catherine Belkhodja, Oshima Nagisa, Kenji Tokitsu

Production:
Les Films de l’Astrophore, Argos Films / 35mm / colour / 106 mins.

Director:
Chris Marker’s prolific career has been distinguished by an artful melding of genres, primarily historical documentary, multimedia and science fiction. He was born in 1921 and fought in the anti-German resistance during World War II.

He began working on documentary films in 1950, and was quickly acclaimed with films such as Statues also Die (1953), co-directed with Alain Resnais, A Sunday in Peking (1956) and Letters from Siberia.

His SF short La Jetée (1962-64), entirely composed from still photographs, is admired as a cult masterpiece. He has also produced many video works, including Level Five.

Also known as a computer media artist and a fanatic of video games, his multi-media installation, Silent Movie, celebrated the centenary of cinema.

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