Pak traders look for new avenues | india | Hindustan Times
  • Saturday, Jun 23, 2018
  •   °C  
Today in New Delhi, India
Jun 23, 2018-Saturday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Pak traders look for new avenues

THEY ARE on no tourist trip to India. Neither are they interested in talking regional South Asian politics hinging on the Kashmir issue.

india Updated: Feb 11, 2006 01:09 IST

THEY ARE on no tourist trip to India. Neither are they interested in talking regional South Asian politics hinging on the Kashmir issue.

A six-member delegation of prominent businessmen of the Sargodha Chamber of Commerce & Industry (SCCI) from Central Punjab Province of Pakistan have arrived in Lucknow on invitation by the Indian Industries Association (IIA) to seriously look for trade opportunities and sign “technology transfer” agreements especially in UP’s food processing sector.

The delegation attended an international seminar on “Commercialization of New Technologies in Agro and Food Processing ” on Friday at Hotel Taj Residency and found out very early in the day that trade and international business relations actually knew no boundaries. The Pakistani delegation were constantly surrounded by UP’s eager entrepreneurs in the food processing sector even during a 15- minute tea break at the seminar to make them talk about business opportunities that exist for them in Pakistan.

“When Indian and Pakistani businessmen have traditionally been partners in managing large enterprises in Europe and United States without even discussing regional political issues, there is no reason why trade and technology transfer arrangements cannot take place especially among Indian and Pakistani food processors within South Asia”, SCCI president Abdul Sami Sawhney told HT .

“The IIA had e-mailed us a comprehensive list of agricultural resources available in Uttar Pradesh besides the opportunities to look for trade and technology transfer arrangements well before our delegation arrived to attend the India Food Expo 2006 in this city. India had been traditionally superior with food processing technology than Pakistan which made us even more keen to look for trade and technology transfer opportunities at the ongoing Expo in Lucknow”, he said.

On the possibilities of encouraging two-way investment in food processing projects of Indian and Pakistani entrepreneurs in both countries, Sawhney commented, “With the passage of time we (SCCI) feel that this (two-way investment) can be possible. Right now there is not much of foreign investment taking place in the food-processing sector in Pakistan. We certainly hope that it happens soon”.

On the continuing bottlenecks regarding issuance of visas to businessmen of both sides when they visit each other’s countries, he added: “The SCCI delegation wanted to travel to many cities in India for exploring trade and business opportunities but Indian visa restrictions have provided permission to travel only to Lucknow, Agra and Delhi.”