Rolling Stone mag hits Chinese streets | india | Hindustan Times
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Rolling Stone mag hits Chinese streets

The face of Cui Jian, the godfather of Chinese rock and roll, graced the cover Saturday of the first Chinese edition of the classic American rock and roll magazine

india Updated: Mar 04, 2006 18:06 IST
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The face of Cui Jian, the godfather of Chinese rock and roll, graced the cover Saturday of the first Chinese edition of the classic American rock and roll magazine, Rolling Stone.

The venerable bible of pop culture launched its Chinese edition this month focusing on Asia's emerging youth culture, while promoting foreign arts and entertainment.

Besides articles and a full interview with Cui, the magazine carried stories on Taiwan pop star Jay Chou, Japan's hip-hop artist Nigo and China's Internet blogger famous for her sex dairy, Muzimei, to round out its Asian input into the magazine.

Most of the first Chinese edition was devoted to Western pop and entertainment, including an article on the famous personalities like John Lennon, Jimi Hendrix and Hunter S. Thompson who have been featured on the cover of Rolling Stone.

"We feel Chinese music and arts are maturing rapidly and that a Chinese edition will be viable," said Robby Yung of Hong Kong-based One Media, which publishes the magazine under licence, when the launch was announced.

Yung said the magazine, written in simplified Chinese characters, will rely more heavily on strong writing and photo-journalism than the pop and gossip that marks its English-language sister publication.

"We feel China offers greater potential and we want to be there from the start," said Yung.

Rolling Stone was first published in 1967 in San Francisco by writer Jan Wenner who wanted to chronicle the cultural changes taking place in the United States at the time.

Although it has since realigned itself to compete with more raunchy titillating magazines, it is still regarded by many as the last word on popular music and art.