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Tech hub: India needs to wait

For all who thought India was going to beat US as Tech King soon, it's time to re-check facts, writes Sakshi Arora.

india Updated: Dec 31, 2005 14:03 IST

When software giant Microsoft knocked on Indian techies' gates in December 2005, the world stopped to notice.

Not just Bill Gates, chipmaker Intel, its rival AMD and even Cisco are lining up on Indian doors.

Witha tech total standing for India at $6.85 billion, are we really giving the 'tech hub' US a run for its money?

For all those who thought India was going to beat the US as the Tech King soon, it's time to re-check the facts.

Picture this. For every one million citizens, the United States is producing roughly 750 technology specialists, compared with 500 in China and 200 in India.

Global majors on Indian doors

• Microsoft to hire Indian techies for its headquarters in Seattle

• Also, MS to invest $1.7 billion in India

• Chipmakers Intel and AMD to invest $1.05 billion and $3 billion respectively

• Cisco to invest $1.1 billion and triple its staff in the country

According to a new study, 'Framing the Engineering Outsourcing Debate: Placing the United States on a Level Playing Field with China and India,' US still drives the tech boom.

In 2005, various media reports had stated that in 2004 the United States graduated roughly 70,000 undergraduate engineers, while China graduated 6,00,000 and India 3,50,000.

The study conducted by the Duke University in North Carolina found that "the numbers are inaccurate, or tell only part of the story."

According to the study, apart from four-year engineering degrees, these massive numbers of Indian and Chinese engineering graduates also include three-year training programmes and diploma holders. These numbers have been compared against the annual production of accredited four-year engineering degrees in the United States.

Not just that, due to the lack of refined analysis of the type of graduates and quality of degrees being awarded, the numbers were not grounded in the larger demographics of each country.