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Time takes its toll on City?s heritage structures

CONTINUING WITH the little-known heritage structures of the City, let us have a look at the Jagannanth Dharamshala today. Constructed by Seth Jagannath Mannalalji in 1930, the most striking feature of the dharamshala located at Sanyogitaganj is the huge arched gateway. Local lore has it that the gate, Hathi Darwaza, is high enough to allow a mounted elephant to enter the inn unhindered.

india Updated: Feb 21, 2006 00:32 IST
Saeed Khan

CONTINUING WITH the little-known heritage structures of the City, let us have a look at the Jagannanth Dharamshala today. Constructed by Seth Jagannath Mannalalji in 1930, the most striking feature of the dharamshala located at Sanyogitaganj is the huge arched gateway. Local lore has it that the gate, Hathi Darwaza, is high enough to allow a mounted elephant to enter the inn unhindered.

The Darwaza is a high two-storied square structure and has octagonal corners shaped like bastions to keep potential raiders at bay. Topped by a crown boasting an emblem the central door is of double height with wooden shutters of the kind normally found in fortresses.

Inside, the 34-odd rooms are ringed around a central courtyard while a hallway, covered by a sloping roof supported on wooden posts, runs to the left of the open-to-air space. Time has taken its toll on the impressive structure, which, with its crumbling walls and decaying façade, is in a bad shape today. Numerous illegal encroachments around the building add to the problem.

Bank Of Indore: Bank of Indore (State Bank of Indore) was shifted to its present premises near Rajwada in 1934. Registered under the Indore Companies’ Act, 1914, the bank had branches at Sanawad and Tarana.

In its early days, the bank’s chief income was from “fire and theft proof” lockers in the new building that were hired out to cloth merchants. Rent charged for the locker fluctuated, depending on the size of the trunk, and usually hovered between Rs 5-10.

A golden sun similar to the one engraved on Holkar copper coins, emblazoned the bank’s monogram. Constructed in 1934, the three-storied Bank of Indore building remains one of the most impressive structures in the City. Designed in brick and stone the building is entered through a three-bayed, eight-pillared fake entrance porch.

The porch, which is in the same line as the building, has a hood with the bank’s name and emblem hanging over it. Originally there were two such entrances in addition to a side door designed in the same style but boasting only a single bay.

Both ground and upper floor windows are encased in a masonry frame with semi-circular arches and lotuses at the two upper ends of the frame.

The windows on the ground floor are, however, more ornamentally framed with stone lintel and torana supported on pillars that form the sides of the frame. A stone projection abuts all round making the second and third floor roof level.
Although in reasonably good shape the building is starting to display signs of wear and tear brought about by constant exposure to vehicular pollution.

(Concluded)


Time has taken its toll on the impressive structure, which, with its crumbling walls and decaying façade, is in a bad shape today. Numerous illegal encroachments around the building add to the problem.

First Published: Feb 21, 2006 00:32 IST