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Two more cases of Japanese encephalitis detected in Bundi

With two more patients of Japanese encephalitis (JE) detected at Keshoraipatan town in Bundi district recently, the number of patients suffering from the disease has reached three in the district this year, officials said on Wednesday

jaipur Updated: Dec 06, 2017 20:42 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times
Japanese encephalitis,Bundi,Keshoraipatan
Japanese encephalitis usually spreads in the areas where flood irrigation happens.(REUTERS)

With two more patients of Japanese encephalitis (JE) detected at Keshoraipatan town in Bundi district recently, the number of patients suffering from the disease has reached three in the district this year, officials said on Wednesday.

A rural woman of Keshoraipatan, Manju Panchal (30), had died of Japanese Encephalitis at the Government Maharao Bhim Singh Hospital in Kota on October 31.

Giving information about the two new cases, Dr Ravi Prakash Mathur, additional director, rural health, Rajasthan, said that following the Keshoraipatan resident’s death, a health department team was sent in the first half of November from Jaipur to assess the situation in Keshoraipatan region.

The team had collected larvae samples of Culex mosquitoes, besides collecting blood samples of six human beings. “The blood samples of Ghanshyam Sharma (80) and Balchand (35), along with other samples, were sent to the National Institute of Virology (NIV), Pune, last month. Their reports have arrived now and Ghanshyam and Balchand have been tested positive for JE,” he said.

While Balchand has recovered now, Ghanshyam has been referred to the Government Medical College in Kota for further treatment,” he added.

Meanwhile, another team of the medical and health department visited Keshoraipatan and Arnetha regions of Bundi district on Tuesday and took samples of six people, including 4 people of Keshoraipatan and two people of Arnetha. The team also collected several larvae samples.

Mathur said that Japanese encephalitis usually spreads in the areas where flood irrigation happens. “Since Keshoraipatan is known for rice cultivation in canal fed agricultural fields, so it could be the reason for emergence of the disease in the area,” he said. He said guidelines for surveillance and diagnosis of Japanese encephalitis have been issued to the local health officials in Bundi.

Japanese encephalitis is a mosquito-borne flavivirus, which primarily affects children and also elderly people above 60 years whose immunity remains low. “Most JE infections are characterised by rapid onset of high fever, headache, neck stiffness, disorientation, coma, seizures, spastic paralysis and others,” he said.

Japanese encephalitis is transmitted to humans through bites from infected mosquitoes of the Culex species (mainly Culex tritaeniorhynchus). The virus exists in a transmission cycle between mosquitoes, pigs and water birds. There is no specific treatment to Japanese encephalitis and has only supportive treatment, but there is an effective vaccine available to prevent the disease, informed the doctor.

‘Delay in hospital admission’

Ghanshyam Sharma, who suffered from Japanese encephalitis, had to spend hours for hospital admission at the New Government Medical Hospital in Kota. “When I showed my father in OPD, doctors initially prescribed medicines for him instead of admitting him, but finally admitted him,” alleged Ghanshyam Sharma’s son Suresh Sharma.

When confronted with the patient’s complaint, the government hospital physician, Dr Manoj Saluja, said, “The patient did not exhibit any symptoms of JE, so he was not admitted initially, but since he was referred for diagnosis and tested positive for JE, he was admitted for observation for a day,” he said.

First Published: Dec 06, 2017 20:42 IST