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Home / More Lifestyle / People think Delhi’s theatre audience is vibrant, but it isn’t: Rajit Kapur

People think Delhi’s theatre audience is vibrant, but it isn’t: Rajit Kapur

Rajit Kapur, who started out his career with theatre says the medium still holds a “greater challenge” for him. In Delhi, Kapur loves the food, like many others, and gives a special mention to kebabs from Rajinder ka Dhaba.

more-lifestyle Updated: Oct 29, 2019, 13:59 IST
Rajit Kapur recently performed another play, A Few Good Men, in the city, and was delighted at its fantastic response.
Rajit Kapur recently performed another play, A Few Good Men, in the city, and was delighted at its fantastic response.(Abhinav Saha/Hindustan Times)

“I kept saying ‘We need a younger actor, I’m not 30 anymore’,” says Rajit Kapur, who had “second thoughts” about acting in his latest theatre production, since it required him to push his boundaries.

Kapur, who started out his career with theatre says the medium still holds a “greater challenge” for him, and adds, “I’ve always been doing different mediums whether it’s stage, TV or films. I have never had restrictions. I have to feel connected with the energy [of the character]”.

Kapur, who is appreciated for his performances in the films Raazi and Uri: The Surgical Strike (both 2018), will soon be seen staging Mosambi Narangi, where he will don the role of Mosambi — a junior artist on a film set. Like the setting in the play, did he ever feel star-struck in Bollywood? “I’ve always enjoyed watching Hindi films. I’ve grown up in Mumbai, so have been exposed to films right from childhood. They have always held a fascination for me,” he says.

In Delhi, Kapur loves the food, like many others, and gives a special mention to kebabs from Rajinder ka Dhaba. “You can’t miss that!”

He recently performed another play, A Few Good Men, in the city, and was delighted at its fantastic response. But, he says, “I don’t find a vibrant theatre audience in Delhi. People think it is, but it isn’t. It’s a social audience, [who is] not really interested in watching the play. They are coming because of somebody else coming.” A star, he means? “Either it could be a star presence that may attract somebody or xyz is going and I am going with xyz to see a play. In Pune, Bengaluru or in Mumbai, if they are coming to see a play, they are coming because of the play.”

Known for his portrayal of the famous detective Byomkesh Bakshi in the 1993 TV series of the same name, Kapur says he isn’t doing TV any more as he feels it isn’t “exciting”. “I stopped doing television because [there was] nothing that would charge me and I didn’t want to get stuck with daily soaps. Somewhere they ruin an actor beyond a point. You’re just becoming mechanical,” he says.

His character Sadiq Sir, from his latest OTT show, has an immediate connect with the millennials. But, how does he manage to make a mark across mediums? “Time management is something I’ve learned as a production person. It’s a li’l crazy and I think I need to slow down a bit,” he laughs.

naina.arora@htdigital.in
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