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Home / More Lifestyle / Trending #Solo: Eating, studying and partying alone

Trending #Solo: Eating, studying and partying alone

So many people are doing so much alone, that there are viral hashtags for the trend. Incidentally, these tend to originate in the heavily online young-adult populations of Japan and Korea.

more-lifestyle Updated: Feb 07, 2020 22:01 IST
Madhusree Ghosh
Madhusree Ghosh
Hindustan Times
Mukbang started out in Seoul, South Korea, as a way for busy professionals eating lunch alone to socialise, and feel less alone. It has become a viral trend that features high-definition sound and large amounts of food or decadent foods.
Mukbang started out in Seoul, South Korea, as a way for busy professionals eating lunch alone to socialise, and feel less alone. It has become a viral trend that features high-definition sound and large amounts of food or decadent foods.

Mukbang

Mukbang or meokbang originated in Korea around the turn of the decade. It came from Korea’s culture of eating out alone, and the clips were initially webcast in real time. The word is a portmanteau of the words meukda (eating) and bang song (broadcast), roughly translating as broadcasting while eating, or eat-casting.

Today, mukbang has evolved into the art of eating large amounts of food or decadent foods, while filming with heightened, high-definition sound. Though the trend originated in Seoul, where harried office-goers often ate lunch alone and began to log on and broadcast for company, there are now popular Indian mukbangers as well. Manipuri YouTubers Kebola Wahengbam and Apei Opalić, for instance, have thousands of subscribers each. 

Benkyou Douga

The term is Japanese for Study Clips. Youngsters are seeing thousands of fellow students log in to watch them study, by themselves. Some say it helps to have an audience, as a form of company; some in the audience, who are also studying alone, say the same.

The videos typically show students quietly studying for hours, sometimes a fan rotating overhead, or quiet instrumental music playing. People watching but not studying say they find the videos restful. It’s a way, watchers and posters say, to feel like you’re socialising during alone time and a way to make friends without really making friends.

In Korea, the trend is called Gongbang, short for “gongbu bangsong” or “study broadcast”. Thousands of people subscribe to the ‘broadcasters’’ accounts and many leave encouraging comments. Some say the videos encourage them to study too, and help bring discipline to their studying patterns as well as easing anxiety. 

Ohitorisama

Loosely translated, this is Japanese for ‘one person’. Online, people use this hashtag to mean ‘party of one’. Hundreds of thousands of post on Instagram show people enjoying solo activities like single-portion meals, or solo karaoke — a trend currently growing in Japan. The term, and the videos, are part of a shift towards celebrating singlehood and time spent alone, while also enriching it by doing things one truly enjoys.