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Adopt AICTE’s engineering curriculum, technical education tells Maharashtra universities

The model engineering curriculum has been prepared based on the recommendations of 11 subject committees and puts more focus on practical knowledge.

mumbai Updated: Apr 20, 2018 23:55 IST
Musab Qazi
Musab Qazi
Hindustan Times
Engineering colleges in the city are divided on the effectiveness of the new model curriculum.
Engineering colleges in the city are divided on the effectiveness of the new model curriculum.(Representational photo)

In a bid to improve technical education in Maharashtra, the state directorate of technical education (DTE) has asked universities to adopt the model curriculum for undergraduate engineering courses prepared by All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE).

The model engineering curriculum has been prepared based on the recommendations of 11 subject committees, set up by AICTE for engineering and technical institutes, excluding the Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) and National Institutes of Technology (NITs).

The new curriculum puts emphasis on practical knowledge and laboratory work, with the credit requirements for theory reduced from 220 to 160 in order to allow for other components.

In a letter to vice-chancellors of all universities in the state, Abhay Wagh, director, technical education, requested to initiate the formalities leading to the implementation of the curriculum in their respective universities and their affiliated colleges from the academic year 2018-19.

“In the last few years, the standard of technical education has been deteriorating. In such a scenario, DTE has decided to put emphasis on quality improvement,” said an official from the directorate.

In a first, the directorate has also formed a ‘core advisory committee’, which consists of educationists and representatives of industry, to advice engineering institutes and administrators on various aspects of the engineering programme. The panel, led by AD Shahane, vice president, Larson and Toubro, Mumbai, has been tasked with improving quality of education to enhance the employability of students and promote entrepreneurship.

In February, DTE held a workshop in the city for representatives from of all engineering colleges in the city to address “issues and challenges” in enhancing the quality of technical education.

Engineering colleges in the city are, however, divided on the effectiveness of the new model curriculum.

Braj Mishra, principal, Thakur College of Engineering and Technology, believes that the model curriculum will result in more employment opportunities for the students. “The curriculum provides more time for internships and industry-oriented activities. The internships may lead to employment.”

Mishra added that the decision of adopting the curriculum will have to be taken by the university boards of studies, but the directorate also has a role to play.

“The curriculum has a mere 10% variable component, which is not sufficient. There cannot be a uniform syllabus for different parts of the country,” said principal of an engineering college in suburbs, requesting anonymity. He also said the DTE is merely trying to “make its presence felt”.

“Let universities do their jobs,” he said.