February 14: Last date to apply for V-C’s post at Mumbai varsity | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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February 14: Last date to apply for V-C’s post at Mumbai varsity

As per the Maharashtra Public Universities Act, 2016, the search committee must recommend at least five names to the governor

mumbai Updated: Jan 10, 2018 23:38 IST
Musab Qazi
The governor will eventually nominate one of the applicants as the V-C.
The governor will eventually nominate one of the applicants as the V-C. (HT file )

Three months after governor Ch Vidyasagar Rao sacked former vice-chancellor of the University of Mumbai Sanjay Deshmukh from the post, the search committee appointed to look for a new V-C has invited applications for the job.

The committee, which comprises K Kasturirangan, chairperson, National Education Policy, Shyam Lal Soni, director, National Institute of Technology, Uttarakhand and Bhushan Gagrani, vice-chairperson and managing director, City and Industrial Development Corporation (Cidco), plans to shortlist candidates and interviews. Those interested in the post, have to apply by February 14. The applicants for the posts should fulfill various criteria enlisted in a state government order issued in May 2009.

As per the Maharashtra Public Universities Act, 2016, the search committee must recommend at least five names for the post to the governor, who is also the chancellor of all the public universities in the state. The governor will eventually nominate one of the applicants as the V-C.

The post at the varsity fell vacant in October 2017 after Deshmukh, who was appointed in June 2015, was sacked by Rao for his ‘his gross negligence and failure in implementing the On-Screen Marking (OSM) system, to declare the results of examinations held in summer 2017. This was the first time in the history of MU that a V-C was sacked.

Deshmukh’s decision to replace pen-and-paper assessment method with OSM delayed results of lakhs of students for several months. Many of them lost job opportunities, while others failed to pursue their higher education. The results were found to be riddled with errors, causing outrage among teachers and students.