Maharashtra Maratha quota: Why should we pay for bill, ask MBBS aspirants
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Maharashtra Maratha quota: Why should we pay for bill, ask MBBS aspirants

Terming the bill to grant 16% reservation to Marathas in government-run education institutes and jobs as a violation of the right to education of open category students, parents of medical aspirants plan to fight it in court.

mumbai Updated: Nov 30, 2018 14:26 IST
Shreya Bhandary
Shreya Bhandary
Hindustan Times, Mumbai
maratha reservation,maharashtra,mumbai
Medical and dental courses aspirants belonging to the open category in Maharashtra are unhappy with the 16% reservation granted to the Maratha community as it will now leave only 15-18% seats for them in these courses. (HT File / Representaive Photo )

The clearing of the bill to grant 16% reservation to Marathas in government-run education institutes and jobs has left medical and dental aspirants in the state unhappy, as they will now be left with only 15-18% of the seats in the open category.

More than two lakh students apply for medical seats in Maharashtra every year. Currently, 50% of undergraduate medical seats in government-run institutes are kept aside for students from the reserved categories (SC/ST/OBC/VJNT). From the remaining 50% for the open category, 14% seats go to PwD, defence and other quotas. “There is also a 3-5% special quota (depending on eligible candidates) for students from reserved categories who are eligible for an open quota seat based on their scores. Add another 16% Maratha quota and this will leave students in the open category with 15-18% seats only,” said one concerned parent.

This means, of the 3,050 seats available in government-run MBBS institutes, students from the open category will now have less than 275 seats.

Terming it violation of the right to education of open category students, parents of medical aspirants plan to fight it in court. “We have been seeking legal opinion on this matter. Specialised courses such as medical and engineering are sought-after not just in the state, but across the country. Introducing a new quota reduces the chances of a student in the open category to get a seat, which is unfair,” said Sudha Shenoy, a parent.

Officials from the state Directorate of Medical Education & Research (DMER) have requested parents to remain calm. “The state government is yet to release an official resolution on this. They will definitely take into consideration the plight of open category students. We should wait for the official notification before taking any further steps,” said Dr Pravin Shingare, director, DMER.

First Published: Nov 30, 2018 14:26 IST