Manjula Shetye custodial death: Address women inmates’ plaints in court every week, says panel | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Manjula Shetye custodial death: Address women inmates’ plaints in court every week, says panel

The report also found that jails across the state are overcrowded and some of them house inmates more than 400% their capacity. 

mumbai Updated: Nov 21, 2017 00:07 IST
Faisal Malik
Faisal Malik
Hindustan Times
Mumbai,Manjula Shetye,Custodial death
Manjula Shetye, a convict, who was lodged in the women’s jail in Byculla, was allegedly tortured by jail staff after which she succumbed to her injuries at state-run JJ hospital on June 23 this year.(HT FILE)

A special investigation team (SIT) appointed by Maharashtra State Commission for Women (MSCW) after the alleged custodial death of Manjula Shetye has suggested, in its report, that the complaints and grievances of women prisoners be addressed in court every week, their living conditions be improved by being provided facilities for maintaining physical and mental health and sensitization of jail staff over rights of prisoners.

The report also found that jails across the state are overcrowded and some of them house inmates more than 400% their capacity.The report also suggested that prisoners need to be shifted to jails where the number is comparatively less, said the report.

The MSCW submitted the report to CM Devendra Fadnavis on Monday. The SIT was formed to investigate into the facilities provided and security arrangements made for women prisoners across the state.

Shetye, a convict, who was lodged in the women’s jail in Byculla, was allegedly tortured by jail staff after which she succumbed to her injuries at state-run JJ hospital on June 23 this year.MSCW chairperson Vijata Rahatkar said, “We also want new jails to be developed so that excess prisoners can be accommodated in them. We have suggested the same to the state government in our report.”Another option could be that the prisoners who have completed three years in such jails can be shifted to open jails instead of the present rule of five years, she added.

The report also suggested that courts take complaints through video calls once a week to keep check on their prisoners’ living conditions.

“Regular visits by expert doctors should be made available for counselling and regular check-ups of prisoners,” the report said.

First Published: Nov 21, 2017 00:07 IST